Dr. Joshua Cobb1,2,3

ID# 428, (1809 - 1879)
FatherGideon Dyer Cobb4,5,6 (11 Sep 1773 - 1 Mar 1834)
MotherModena Chittenden Clark5,6 (4 Oct 1779 - 7 Oct 1837)

Key Events:

Birth: 19 Apr 1809, Eddyville, Livingston Co., Kentucky7,8,9
Marriage: 23 Jun 1835, Eddyville, Caldwell Co., Kentucky, Julia Ann Mims (7 Jul 1812 - 11 Sep 1841)10,11,12
Marriage: 18 Jan 1843, Clarksville, Montgomery Co., Tennessee, Marina Turner Bryan (18 Mar 1811 - 7 Dec 1890)13,14,15
Death: 7 Apr 1879, temporary County Court House (Baptist Church), Clarksville, Montgomery Co., Tennessee16,17,18
Burial: City Cemetery, Clarksville, Montgomery Co., Tennessee19
ChartsDescendants of Linah and Rebeccah (Davis) Mims
Descendants of Gideon Cobb
AncestryThe Cobbs of Pawlet, Vermont

Copyright Notice

Narrative:

      Dr. Joshua Cobb was born on 19 Apr 1809 in Eddyville, Livingston Co., Kentucky, which formally became part of Caldwell county two weeks later.7,8,9
     He is probably one of the three males under age 10 listed in the household of his father, Gideon Dyer Cobb, in the 1810 Federal Census of Eddyville, Caldwell Co., Kentucky.20,21 He was probably one of the two males age 10 to 16 listed in the household of his father in the 1820 Federal Census of Eddyville, Caldwell Co., Kentucky.22

Sent Off to School --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Joshua attended the Washington Literary, Scientific and Military Gymnasium in Georgetown, District of Columbia, in 1827-28, studying arithmetic, algebra, geography, English, and French "with success and credit to himself," according to the Superintendent, his uncle, James Dyer Cobb.23
Dr. Joshua Cobb
from Picturesque Clarksville24
His uncle taught in the science department and the English branches, and a Mr. Chauncy W. Fitch taught Greek, Latin, and French. Others give lectures in natural history, "chymistry" and mineralogy. Students were known as cadets, and required to dress in "uniforms of a military cut and fashion." The hours of instruction were from sunrise to sunset, with study and recitations for eight hours, and the remainder for military and gymnastic exercises. Parents were promised that "cadets are never to be out of the knowledge of the superintendent." Cadets from a distance, presumably including Joshua, could board with the superintendent's family, where they would pass their evenings with him "in a room for the purpose," and lodge in rooms adjoining his.25,26

West Point and Medical School --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Joshua applied to the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1828, sponsored by close family friend, Congressman Chittenden Lyon. The Congressman said he was "of strict moral character and possesses in a high degree the necessary qualifications" for admission. At that time, applicants had to be between 14 and 21 years of age, and "well versed in reading, writing, and arithmetic." Candidates were selected by the Secretary of War, customarily on the advice of Congressmen. He was admitted 1 Jul 1828.27,28,29 He remained a cadet for three years, but, contrary to several published reports, did not graduate and left the Academy at the end of the 1830-31 term.29,30,31,32,33
     Joshua reportedly studied medicine at Georgetown, District of Columbia, and at Transylvania University at Lexington, Kentucky after leaving West Point. However, the only medical school then in the District, the Medical Department of Columbia College (later George Washington University), was not in Georgetown, then a separate city, but in Washington. There is no record of his attendance there.34,35,36,37 Reports that he studied at Transylvania College, Lexington, Kentucky, in 1834-35, have been confirmed. Transylvania, now a small liberal arts college, was founded in 1780, and the Medical Department in 1799. However, the reports that he graduated "with honors" have not been; no record of his graduation has yet been found.38,39,40,41
     He was probably one of the seven males age 20 to 30 listed in the household of his father in the 1830 Federal Census of Eddyville, Caldwell Co., Kentucky.42
     Joshua married first Julia Ann Mims, daughter of Linah Mims and Rebeccah Davis, on 23 Jun 1835 in Eddyville, Caldwell Co., Kentucky.10,11,12
     Joshua bought lot no. 29, on Second St.. In Eddyville from his sister's husband, James G. Clark, on 27 Nov 1836, for $200.43

Joining the Iron Works in Tennessee --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Joshua and Julia moved to Stewart Co., Tennessee, about 1837 where he became resident physician at Cumberland Iron Works Company.44,45,46 The firm operated three furnaces, at Bear Springs, Dover, and Bellwood, where it employed slave labor, and he was contracted to provide medical care to the slaves. He also soon built a practice in the surrounding county.47,48,49,50
     On 23 Jan 1837 Joshua bought two half-acre lots in Eddyville from Hannah and John Hallick, his sister and her husband, for $147.51
     Joshua appeared on the 1840 Federal Census of Stewart Co., Tennessee, with a household consisting of 1 white male under 5 (son Robert), 1 white male between 15 and 20 (perhaps a nephew), 1 white male between 30 and 40 (himself), 2 white females under 5 (daughters Irene, and perhaps Ione?), 1 white female between 20 and 30 (wife Julia), and a male and a female slave, both between 10 and 24. One person was recorded as employed in the "learned professions and engineering," no doubt Dr. Joshua.52
     His wife died on 11 Sep 1841 at Cumberland Iron Works, Stewart Co., Tennessee.53,54
     On 18 Apr 1842 Joshua took a mortgage on a female Negro slave, Hanah, about 40 years of age, and her future increases from George M. Marshall, husband of his sister Persis, to secure a note for $200.55
     Joshua married second Marina Turner Bryan, daughter of Col. Henry Hunter Bryan, on 18 Jan 1843 in Clarksville, Montgomery Co., Tennessee.13,14,15
     After the death of his first wife he gave up his medical practice and turned to the iron business. In partnership with Thomas W. Barksdale, Samuel Cooke, and William Bradley, he purchased a considerable number of tracts rich in iron ore and organized the Rough and Ready Furnace Company in 1845. They operated the Company successfully for a year, and then sold it for $65,000 to Barksdale, Johnson & Co. Joshua, D. N. Kennedy, and William Phillips then bought the Lagrange Furnace, operating under the name of Cobb, Phillips & Co. It became a very lucrative investment, and they built the Eclipse Furnace and bought the Clark Furnace and one-third of the Girard Furnace. But the property depreciated greatly during the Civil War. The business, previously valued at $250,000, was sold for $75,000, about the only iron company to salvage any value after the war.56,57,58

His Support of Education --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     When the Clarksville Female Academy was opened across Madison St. from Joshua's home in 1846, he was among the major supporters, subscribing to 19 shares at $25 each. The school was occupied by both Confederate and Union troops during the war, but was repaired and reopened afterwards. He served on the Board of Trust for many years, and was it's President at the time of his death. When the state legislature granted authority in 1856 to incorporate Stewart College, he was one of the applicants, along with other prominent men in the community.59,60,61,62
     Joshua and Marina appeared on the 1850 Federal Census of Stewart Co., Tennessee, enumerated 5 Dec 1850, reporting real estate valued at $5,000. He also reported owning 14 slaves, ranging in age from one to 30, of which four were males. Their children Edwin, Marina, Mary, Virginia and Sallie were listed as living with them, as was his children by his prior marriage, Irene and Robert, and her sons by her prior marriage, George and William T. Dortch.63,64

Moving to Clarksville --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Joshua and Marina moved their family to Clarksville, in 1851, where he sold iron, bought iron-working supplies, and settled his accounts. He apparently also resumed his medical practice, as he is listed as a physician, at the southeast corner of 5th St. and Commerce St., in the 1859-60 Clarksville city directory. He retired from active business about 1866.65,66,67
     He bought what became the Cobb homestead from Judge William Turner, who had moved to Nashville, Tennessee. The homestead consisted of four acres of forested hills and a small grove between Madison and Commerce and Fifth and Sixth Streets on which was later located the homes of the Merritt, Pettus, and Bowling families in addition to the Cobb home. The home was built by Judge Turner and was not quite finished when Joshua bought it for $5,500.68
Pegram & Cobb Advertisement
from Clarksville Chronicle 2 Nov 186069

     After a sufficient amount of stock in the Memphis, Clarksville, and Louisville Railroad had been sold to justify organizing the company, the commissioners met on 25 May 1853 in Clarksville and elected a board of directors. Joshua was elected president.70
     On 26 Dec 1859 Joshua gave his recently married daughter Irene the lot in Eddyville that he had purchased from his brother-in-law, James G. Clark, in 1836, before he had moved to Steward Co., Tennessee.71
     He was engaged in a partnership with George Pegram of St. Louis operating as commission merchants. They advertised in late 1860 and early 1861, soliciting orders "for the purchase of Flour, Corn, Bacon, &c." The Clarksville business was known as J. Cobb & Co. In St. Louis the business was known as Pegram & Cobb, operating at Main and Plum Sts.69
     Joshua and Marina appeared on the 1860 Federal Census of Clarksville, Montgomery Co., Tennessee, enumerated 7 Sep 1860, reporting real estate of $30,500 and person estate of $15,000. Their children Edwin, Mary, Marina, Virginia, Sallie and Gideon were listed as living with them. He also reported owning nine slaves ranging in age from 14 to 54, six males and three females, housed in two slave houses.72,73

Supporting the War Effort --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     As fear of conflict built in the months leading up to the Civil War, the local militia, which had fallen into disuse, was revived. The 25 May 1861 issue of the Clarksville newspaper reported that the Independent Guard, with Joshua as Captain, had been organized and were drilling every afternoon on the college campus.74 The 5 Jul 1861 issue of the newspaper announced a second company of home-guards had been organized under Capt. W. W. Valliant, known as the Clarksville Guards. It stated that their arms would be muskets, if they can be had, if not double-barrel shot guns.75 An article in the 14 Jul 1861 issue stated that the Independent Guards "will soon be equipped with a nice uniform. It is composed of fine sized, good looking men, whose appearance would put a legion of Yankees to flight; the only use they have for muskets is to shoot the enemy on the wing."76
     On 10 Aug 1861 the Sheriff of Montgomery Co. announced that an election would be held to replace Col. Frank S. Beaumount of the 91st Regiment of Militia of the county, who had resigned. The issue of the local paper carrying this notice also included an article noting that no one had announced an interest in the office, and suggested Joshua for it. The paper said "Dr. Cobb is a regular graduate of West Point, is thoroughly "rubbed up" now, in military tactics, and fully imbued with the martial and patriotic spirit of the times. He is, we think, the very man for the place; and we respectfully urge the regimental voters to elect him."77 Joshua was elected to the office. In the article announcing his election the newspaper said "...knowing his firmness and practical good sense, we hope for a speedy unravelling of the tangled web which the Home Guard of Minute Men system had prepared for him." The article continued, apparently addressing a common belief, "The Militia may discard the delusion that they can neither be drafted nor ordered out of the county because they belong to the Minute Men – a mere police system that never contemplated the enlistment of men beyond the number necessary for patrol duty."78
     There were various reports of activities of the Regiment until 11 Dec 1861, when Joshua, as its commanding officer, issued Special Order No. 7. The order noted that more than half the men subject to militia duty had volunteered and mustered into the Confederate Provisional Army. So the order released all men in the Regiment.79
     On 19 Feb 1862 the Federal gunboats Conestoga and Cairo steamed up the Cumberland River to Clarksville. At Fr. Defiance, near the city, they found a white flag flying and the fort deserted. Arriving at the city they found the Confederate soldiers, including those who had escapted after the surrender of Fr. Donelson, had left the city.80
     The Confederate Army established a hospital at the Clarksville Female Academy early in the war. When Ft. Donelson was surrendered on 16 Feb 1862 Clarksville was quickly evacuated, leaving about 200 sick and wounded patients at the hospital. With no army medical personnel present to care for them, a citizen committee was organized, and Dr. Cobb was named chairman of that committee and surgeon in chief, to exercise general superintendence over the sanitary condition of the hospital, and to select or appoint aids to superintend the various departments. When Federal troops took possession of Clarksville, he was re-appointed surgeon in charge and general superintendent by Col. Crafts J. Wright, commandant of the post. The committee operated the hospital from 20 Feb to 20 Jun 1862, dependant largely on public contributions, and in the end sold supplies to pay its expenses.81
     It has been reported that Joshua went to Virginia as a surgeon for the 14th Tennessee Regiment, in which his younger son Edwin was serving, and accompanied Edwin's body back to Clarksville after his death in May 1863. No mention of him being with the 14th has been found in any contemporary records, nor in any of the recollections of that unit published in subsequent years. He certainly didn't accompany the remains home at that time as they are not returned until eight years later.82,83,84

First Mayor After the War --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     In 1865 Joshua Cobb became Clarksville's first mayor since the war began, serving until 1866, when he was succeeded by John Bailey for a year. Joshua was elected again in 1867 and served until 1869. According to one observer, "life was beginning to make sense again in the town."85,86,87
     The County Court at that time was responsible for functions generally assigned to boards of commissioners or county supervisors today. An elected judge presided, and the magistrates decided issues by vote. Joshua was elected as a magistrate in 1869, and served until his death. He became regarded as the foremost member of the County Court, serving on important committees, and always filled the chair in the absence of the judge. In an obituary he was described as "a vigilant and careful director of the county business, and the sternest opponent of anything adverse in his judgment to the public interest." Another said "the sobriquet of 'the watch-dog of the public treasury' was frequently applied to him."88,89,90
     Joshua and Marina appeared on the 1870 Federal Census of Clarksville, Montgomery Co., Tennessee, enumerated 28 Jun 1870, reporting that she owned $15,000 in real estate and $500 in personal property. Their daughter Sallie was listed as living with them, as were the widower of their daughter Mary Aurelle, John Baker Tapscott, and his daughter Mary. Also listed was her son Dr. George C. Dortch, his wife Elizabeth Jane Worden, and their daughters Susan, Mina and Georgia.91
     Joshua loaned $2,500 to his brother Gideon, apparently as the latter's business was failing in the late 1860s. It appears that the money was lost when Gideon filed for bankruptcy in Oct 1871.92

A Dramatic Death --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---

Dr. Cobb's tombstone
photo by authors

     The quarterly meeting in which Joshua died was attended by 34 magistrates, an unusually large number. Matters before the Court that day included a proposal to exempt ministers from the poll tax, which Joshua "spoke earnestly in favor of." He read the report on appropriations, noting that the matter of perquisites received by the county judge had become the subject of legal proceedings, and thus was not addressed by the committee. After the proposed tax rates, excepting the courthouse tax, were approved, Judge Tyler called for discussion on funding the new Court House. He proposed to use the proceeds of a compromise he had reached in a suit by the County against the L. & N.R.R. to delay the need for a tax for several years. Dr. Cobb objected, contending earnestly that the proceeds were already appropriated by law for payment of the County's railroad debt, and could not be diverted. Further, he said the compromise damaged the interests of the County, and Judge Tyler was not authorized to agree to it. The Judge responded "with much energy." Dr. Cobb moved for a committee of three "to enquire into the circumstances of the compromise and the authority of the Judge to make it." While that motion was being discussed Joshua collapsed and died within a few minutes, stopping the proceedings.93,94
     He was apparently a man of strong convictions. He was described as "a highly educated man... possessed of acute penetration as a business mind, and a most energetic asserter of his opinions, which, however, were generally well founded. In this connection his one infirmity was a highly irascible temperament, which was a source of trouble to him and with which he earnestly struggled. He was a man of strong religious convictions and recognized as high standard of moral responsibility, though he had not made a public profession of religion at his death."95
     Joshua died on 7 Apr 1879 in temporary County Court House (Baptist Church), Clarksville, Montgomery Co., Tennessee, at age 69.16,17,18
     The following article appeared Courier-Journal 8 Apr 1879 :
At about half-past ten o'clock this morning the whole community was shocked to learn that Dr. Joshua Cobb had died suddenly of heart disease while in discharge of his duties as a member of the County Court at the Court House in this city. The report spread rapidly and great excitement prevailed. The Count Court was engaged in its regular April term in transacting its business. The report of Judge Tyler upon the compromise of a recent lawsuit of the county against the Louisville & Nashville railroad was up for discussion. Dr. Cobb made a speech in relation to the subject, during which he showed great earnestness and appeared, as he always did when deeply interested in a discussion, very much excited. At the close of his remarks, while another member was addressing the Court, he staggered, uttered a peculiar sound and fell forward into the arms of those who stood near him. Drs. Daniel F. Wright and C. W. Bailey were called to assistance. Proper restoratives were applied, but all efforts were fruitless, as his spirit had flown from earth. * * * For some time past his health has been gradually failing, until death the fatal blow while he was manfully for what he deemed the best interest of his county, leaving to be inscribed upon his monument the noble tribute, 'Died at his post." * * * Out of respect to his memory the County Court has adjourned until Monday, April 21, and all places of business will be closed at the time of his funeral.96
He was buried in City Cemetery, later known as Riverview Cemetery, Clarksville, Montgomery Co., Tennessee, with his second wife, Marina, his daughter Mary Aurelle Cobb Tapscott, and his sons Gideon Clark Cobb and Edwin B. Cobb.19
     His funeral at the Methodist Church was "largely attended," as "large an audience as we remember ever to have seen there", with services conducted by Rev. R. K. Brown and W. Mooney.97,98
     Joshua died intestate (without leaving a will) and letters of administration for his estate were issued on 30 Apr 1879 in Montgomery County Court to Marina Turner Bryan, his widow. She made a bond for $1,000, with her sons by her first marriage, William and Dr. George C. Dortch, as sureties. But no further record of the probate has been found.99,100

Children:
     Children with Julia Ann Mims:

Children:
     Children with Marina Turner Bryan:

Citations

  1. [S732] Caldwell Co. Marriage Records, loose papers, bond of Joshua Cobb and Samuel P. L. Marshall, 23 Jun 1835, signed by him as Joshua Cobb; and License, dated same day, shows name as Joshua Cobb.
  2. [S728] Montgomery Co. Marriage Register, vol. 1, pg 51, no. 492, Joshua Cobb to Maina T. Dortch, 18 Jan 1843.
  3. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows name as Dr. Joshua Cobb.
  4. [S1012] Cobb, USMA Cadet Application Papers, 13 Feb 1828 letter from G. D. Cobb to Congressman C. Lyon, authorizing the Congressman to sign his name "to any instrument of writing that may be necessary to show my approbation as it ____ my son Joshua Cobb getting the appointment as cadet to West Point;" 19 Mar 1828 letter signed by Chittenden Lyon for G D. Cobb giving his assent "that his son Joshua Cobb" may sign papers binding him to military service upon graduation.
  5. [S2303] Kilbury-Cobb, "RE: Cobb Ancestry," e-mail to author, 15 Jun 2001, citing hand-written pages titled "From Joshua Cobb's Family Bible," provided by Lillian W. Sprout, 5 Dec 1931, Montrose, Pennsylvania.
  6. [S1352] The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, pg 214.
  7. [S2303] Kilbury-Cobb, "RE: Cobb Ancestry," e-mail to author, 15 Jun 2001, citing hand-written pages titled "From Joshua Cobb's Family Bible," provided by Lillian W. Sprout, granddaughter of Joshua Cobb, with notarized statement 5 Dec 1931, Montrose, Pennsylvania, that they were from a Bible in her possession, shows date as "19th day of May - April, 1809" stating that May is crossed out.
  8. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows month, year, and town.
  9. [S1012] Cobb, USMA Cadet Application Papers, 9 Jan 1828 letter of recommendation from Congressman Chittenden Lyon to James Barbour, Secretary of War, shows him born and raised in the town where Lyon resides.
  10. [S732] Caldwell Co. Marriage Records, loose papers, bond of Joshua Cobb and Samuel P. L. Marshall, 23 Jun 1835, shows intended to be married shortly, and License, dated same day, has return showing marriage solemnized same day.
  11. [S726] Caldwell Co. Marriage Bonds, Book A, Joshua Cobb to Julia Mims, 23 Jun 1835, shows date.
  12. [S3048] "Sudden Death of Dr. Joshua Cobb," The Courier-Journal, 8 Apr 1879, shows town and state.
  13. [S728] Montgomery Co. Marriage Register, vol. 1, pg 51, no. 492, Joshua Cobb to Maina T. Dortch, 18 Jan 1843, shows date.
  14. [S49] Freeman, Family File "David and Deborah.GED," 31 Jul 1998, shows year, town, county, and state; reports 1870 census of Clarksville, Montgomery Co., Tennessee shows them apparently as heads of household.
  15. [S1023] "Death of Mrs. Cobb," Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf, 9 Dec 1890, shows date and as her second marriage.
  16. [S2023] Montgomery Co. Court Minutes Book, 29:157, shows date, that he was stricken during the session and died "in very few minutes."
  17. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows he died while attending court "Monday last;" the preceding Monday was 7 Apr.
  18. [S1016] "Quarterly Meeting of the County Court," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows that the Court was meeting at the temporary Court House (the Baptist Church).
  19. [S3363] Dr. Joshua Cobb grave marker, Riverside Cemetery.
  20. [S583] Cobb & Clarke household, 1810 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky.
  21. [S826] Lyon letter to Witherell, 5 Apr 1828, shows that Samuel C. Clark was living with G. D. Cobb in 1828.
  22. [S576] Gideon D. Cobb household, 1820 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky.
  23. [S1012] Cobb, USMA Cadet Application Papers, 9 Jan 1828 letter of recommendation from Congressman Chittenden Lyon, shows he had been a student there for "near a year past;" and Jan 1828 letter of recommendation from James D. Cobb, Superintendent of the seminary, shows he had been a cadet there for nearly a year, and lists studies.
  24. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville.
  25. [S2690] "Prospectus of the Washington Literary, Scientific and Military Gymnasium," Daily National Intelligencer, 25 Jul 1826, outlines curriculum, opening date, rates; same notice also ran 22, 26, and 27 Jul.
  26. [S2691] "A Card," Daily National Intelligencer, 30 Aug 1826, shows instructors and hours; same notice ran also 2 and 4 Sep.
  27. [S1012] Cobb, USMA Cadet Application Papers, 9 Jan 1828 letter of application from Joshua Cobb; letter same date from Congressman Chittenden Lyon to James Barbour, Secretary of War, requesting consideration of Cobb's application; letter of recommendation from Lyon same date, describing his character, and noting that he was a grandson of Revolutionary officer Col. Isaac Clark, and 22 Mar 1828 letter of acceptance from Joshua Cobb.
  28. [S1013] Broadwater, Introduction, pg iv, describes application requirements and process.
  29. [S899] List of Cadets, United States Military Academy, pg 30, shows he was admitted in 1 Jul 1828 but did not graduate.
  30. [S1014] List of Cadets, United States Military Academy, Jun 1829 issue, pg 16, shows him as ranked 54 of 70 fourth class (freshman) cadets in order of merit at the June general examination, and pg 20 shows him ranked 77 of 209 cadets for conduct; Jun 1830 issue, pg 12, shows him as ranked 51 of 59 third class cadets by merit, and pg 19 shows him ranked 15 of 215 cadets for conduct; Jun 1831 issue, pg 9, shows him ranked 49 of 52 second class cadets by merit and marked "deficient," pg 20, shows him ranked 76 of 219 cadets for conduct.
  31. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 266, shows he "graduated at West Point Military Academy in 1835 with distinction."
  32. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows he was a graduate of West Point.
  33. [S1352] The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, pg 214, shows he was a graduate of the U. S. Military Academy, West Point, in 1831.
  34. [S1352] The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, pg 214, shows he" began the study of medicine at Georgetown, D. C., and during the summers of 1834-35 attended lectures at Transylvania University, Lexington, Ky."
  35. [S1353] Kayser, A Medical Center, pg 19, shows the Medical Department lectures were conducted at the building located at 10th and E Streets from about 1825 through 1834, when lectures were "for some cause they were suspended for a few years"; pg 39 shows lectures were resumed after 1839.
  36. [S3191] Studentclearinghouse.org, "DegreeVerify Trans.," e-mail to author, 17 Mar 2011, shows no record of enrollment nor a degree.
  37. [S1479] Interview, Anderson, 27 Feb 2008, reported that available alumni records do not show Joshua Cobb during any years in the 1830's.
  38. [S1065] Gooch, "RE: Records of Early Students?," e-mail to author, 28 Nov 2006, stating that the library's archives has a database/card file listing of Transylvania students from the early 1800s through the 1970s, which includes this entry: Cobb, Joshua; Eddyville, Ky.; Transylvania Medical Department; 1834-35. She states that there is no indication that he received a medical degree from the university, and that one of the prerequisites for the medical degree was the completion of a medical thesis. The listings for those students who received the medical degree include the name of the medical thesis. This is the only information she located on a Joshua Cobb.
  39. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 266, shows he "won high honors in medical schools."
  40. [S1352] The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, pg 214, shows "Having attracted attention by his brilliant standing as as student, he was, immediately after receiving his degree, appointed resident physician of the Cumberland Iron Works."
  41. [S1066] About Transy, online, gives short history of the university.
  42. [S1789] Gideon Cobb household, 1830 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky.
  43. [S1975] Deeds, Cook Co., Illinois, H:302-3, James Clark to Joshua Cobb, 16 Dec 1836.
  44. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows he moved to the Cumberland Iron Works about 1837.
  45. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 266, shows he became resident physician at the iron works.
  46. [S1288] Beach, Along the Warioto, pg 132, shows he served as physician to Cumberland Iron Works.
  47. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows he was Superintendent at Cumberland Iron Works for many years.
  48. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 266, shows he became resident physician at the iron works, and built a private practice in the area.
  49. [S642] Joshua Cobb household, 1850 U.S. Census, Stewart Co., Tennessee, shows occupation as "phisician."
  50. [S640] Joshua Cobb household, 1860 U.S. Census, Montgomery Co., Tennessee, shows occupation as doctor.
  51. [S1975] Deeds, Cook Co., Illinois, H:335-6, John Hallick & wife Hannah to Joshua Cobb, 8 Feb 1837.
  52. [S634] Joshua Cobb household, 1840 U.S. Census, Steward Co., Tennessee.
  53. [S1998] Julia Ann Cobb and daughter Ione grave marker, Eddyville Cemetery, shows date.
  54. [S3048] "Sudden Death of Dr. Joshua Cobb," The Courier-Journal, 8 Apr 1879, shows year and place, as Cumberland Iron Works.
  55. [S1975] Deeds, Cook Co., Illinois, K:424-5, George M. Marshall mortgage to Joshua Cobb, 28 May 1842.
  56. [S1352] The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, pg 214, shows he retired from medicine; purchased a large amount of land containing ore banks, organized Rough and Ready Furnace Company in 1845; sold it at large profit next year; organized new company and added the other furnaces; and states "It was mainly owing to his effort that the industry with which he was identified was enabled to survive the calamities of the civil war."
  57. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 266-7, shows he bought a large amount of land rich in iron ore and gave up his practice and formed Rough and Ready Furnace Company about 1844. Names other principals; describes sale after a year; purchase of Lagrange Furnace with partners; other furnaces added; and effects of the war.
  58. [S1288] Beach, Along the Warioto, pg 132, shows he was interested in the Rough and Ready Furnace Company.
  59. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 68-9, shows list of subscribers and history of the Academy.
  60. [S646] Montgomery County, Tennessee Genealogy Website, online, Clarksville Female Academy section, provides copy 1878 Catalogue and Announcement. Page titled "Incorporated Board of Trust" which lists him has President, and page with history shows date of founding.
  61. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows he was a Trustee of the Academy at an early stage and continued until his death, when he was Chairman of the Board.
  62. [S1288] Beach, Along the Warioto, pg 160, shows his connection with Stewart College.
  63. [S642] Joshua Cobb household, 1850 U.S. Census, Stewart Co., Tennessee.
  64. [S643] Joshua Cobb, owner, 1850 U.S. Census, Stewart Co., Tennessee, slave schedule.
  65. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows he moved to Clarksville in 1851.
  66. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 267, shows iron businesses, and retired about 1866.
  67. [S944] Davis, Folk Finders, citing Clarksville City Directory 1859-1860, shows occupation as physician and address.
  68. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 267.
  69. [S8950] Pegram & Cobb advertisment, Clarksville Chronicle, 2 Nov 1860.
  70. [S2731] "Memphis, Clarksville and Louisville Railroad Company," The Daily Picayune, 7 Jun 1853.
  71. [S3152] Deeds, Lyon Co., Kentucky, B:127-8, Joshua Cobb of Clarksville Tennessee to my daughter Irene Gracey formerly Cobb of Eddyville, 23 Jan 1860.
  72. [S640] Joshua Cobb household, 1860 U.S. Census, Montgomery Co., Tennessee.
  73. [S641] Joshua Cobb, owner, 1860 U.S. Census, Montgomery Co., Tennessee, slave schedule.
  74. [S8945] "The Independent Guards," Clarksville Chronicle, 25 May 1861.
  75. [S8946] "Another Home-Guard," Clarksville Chronicle, 5 Jul 1861.
  76. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, Appendix, pg 47, citing the Chronicle, 14 Jun 1861. This article is missing from online copies of the paper, apparently having been in the sections clipped before microfilming.
  77. [S8947] "Election Notice" and "Militia Election," Clarksville Chronicle, 16 Aug 1861.
  78. [S8948] "Election," Clarksville Chronicle, 6 Sep 1861.
  79. [S8949] "Special Order No. 7," Clarksville Chronicle, 13 Dec 1861.
  80. [S8941] The War of the Rebellion, series I, vol VII, pp 422-3, "Report of Flag-Officer Andrew H. Foote," 22 Feb 1862.
  81. [S2379] Solomon, clerk, "Report of the Clerk of the 'C. F. A. Hospital.'"
  82. [S8957] Rubel, "Re: Frank Patton Gracey," e-mail to author, 22 Jan 2002, shows Dr. Cobb went into Virginia as a surgeon for the 14th mending the soldiers.
  83. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, after mentioning son Edwin had been killed in the war, says "He was well known to the present writer" (who is not identified) "have been offically employed by him at the militiary hosptial at Rockbridge, Alum Spring, Va." The reference to "him" would normally seem to refer to Edwin, but it seems unlikely a 17-year-old private was in a position to employ anyone. But if it refers to Joshua, the hospital only operated, according to available accounts, in the late fall of 1861 and possibly early months of 1862, while Joshua was often reported to be active with the Militia in Clarksville. There are no reports of Joshua going to Virginia in the local paper before it was closed in Feb 1862.
  84. [S3378] Edwin B. Cobb burial notice, Clarksville Weekly Chronicle, 25 Mar 1871, shows his remains arrived "on Thursday last" and was escorted to the City Cemetery and buried.
  85. [S315] Waters, Historic Clarksville, pg. 77, shows he was first mayor since war, dates, and quote.
  86. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 267, shows he served several terms.
  87. [S944] Davis, Folk Finders, "Public Folks, 1-100," citing Memorabilia of Clarksville and Montgomery County, and in a separate listing, Goodspeed's History of Tennessee, Montgomery County, shows him mayor in 1865 and 1867-1868.
  88. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 267-8, shows he served as Magistrate from after retiring from business until his death, and was regarded as a foremost member of the Court, filling the chair in the absence of the Judge.
  89. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows he was elected Magistrate in 1869, recognized as "the ablest and most active member" of the Court, and "vigilant and careful director..." quote.
  90. [S1017] "Dr. Joshua Cobb," Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf, 11 Apr 1879, shows he had been a Magistrate since 14 years, and shows "sobriquet."
  91. [S626] Joshua Cobb household, 1870 U.S. Census, Montgomery Co., Tennessee.
  92. [S3264] Cobb Gellatly & Co., bankruptcy, Schedule A-3, unsecured debts of the firm, and Schedule C-3, unsecured debts of G. D. Cobb.
  93. [S1016] "Quarterly Meeting of the County Court," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, lists the 34 magistrates attending, stating that considerably larger than average number, and describes the issues considered and the discussion.
  94. [S2023] Montgomery Co. Court Minutes Book, 29:157, 7 Apr 1879, shows motion, then Cobb stricken and died "in very few minutes," and no further business was transacted.
  95. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879.
  96. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 268.
  97. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows church, "largely attended," and both ministers.
  98. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows church, "as large as we remember," and Rev. Brown.
  99. [S8704] Will Books, Montgomery Co., Tennessee, S:165, bond of M. T. Cobb and W. J. Dortch, 30 Apr 1879.
  100. [S2023] Montgomery Co. Court Minutes Book, 29:186-7.
  101. [S8719] Irene Cobb Cobb obituary, Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle.
  102. [S642] Joshua Cobb household, 1850 U.S. Census, Stewart Co., Tennessee, shows them in same household, apparently as parent and child.
  103. [S1998] Julia Ann Cobb and daughter Ione grave marker, Eddyville Cemetery, shows Ione as youngest daughter of Dr. J & J A Cobb.
  104. [S1023] "Death of Mrs. Cobb," Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf, 9 Dec 1890, shows Capt. R. L. Cobb as his son by a former marriage.
  105. [S640] Joshua Cobb household, 1860 U.S. Census, Montgomery Co., Tennessee, shows them in same household, apparently as parent and child.
  106. [S3345] Mary Aurrelia Tabscott grave marker, Riverside Cemetery, shows her as daughter of Joshua & Marina T. Cobb.
  107. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows Joshua and Marina were the parents of Mrs. Tapscott.
  108. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows Joshua and Marina were the parents of Mrs. Jessop.
  109. [S2675] Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen.
  110. [S1023] "Death of Mrs. Cobb," Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf, 9 Dec 1890, shows Mrs. Jennie Williams as their daughter.
  111. [S5368] Jennie Cobb Williams, Certificate of Death.
  112. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows Joshua and Marina were the parents of Mrs. Bryce Steward.
  113. [S5369] Sallie West Stewart, Certificate of Death.
  114. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows Joshua and Marina were the parents of a son who died in childhood.
  115. [S944] Davis, Folk Finders, "Death Notices" section, entry for Gideon Clark Cobb, citing Clarksville Weekly Chronicle, 21 Dec 1860 and 4 Jan 1861.