Capt. Robert Linah Cobb1,2,3,4

ID# 426, (1840 - 1895)
FatherDr. Joshua Cobb5,6,7 (19 Apr 1809 - 7 Apr 1879)
MotherJulia Ann Mims5,8,9 (7 Jul 1812 - 11 Sep 1841)

Key Events:

Birth: 5 Mar 1840, Cumberland Iron Works, Stewart Co., Tennessee10,11,12
Marriage: 3 Jan 1877, Poplar Blvd., Shelby Co., Tennessee, Virginia A. Tuck (14 Nov 1848 - 17 May 1886)13,14,15,16
Death: 2 Jun 1895, Clarksville, Montgomery Co., Tennessee17,18,19
Burial: 4 Jun 1895, Greenwood Cemetery, Clarksville, Tennessee20,21
ChartsDescendants of Linah and Rebeccah (Davis) Mims
Descendants of Dr. Davis Green Tuck
Descendants of David Dutt/Toot
Descendants of Gideon Cobb
AncestryThe Linah Mims - Rebecca Davis Family
The Cobbs of Pawlet, Vermont

Copyright Notice

Narrative:

     Capt. Robert Linah Cobb was born at 5 Mar 1840 at Cumberland Iron Works, Stewart Co., Tennessee.10,11,12
     He was probably the male under age 5 listed in the household of his father, Dr. Joshua Cobb, in the 1840 Federal Census of Stewart Co., Tennessee.22
     His mother died on 11 Sep 1841, when Robert was 1 year old.23,24
     He appeared on the 1850 Federal Census of Stewart Co., Tennessee, in the household of his father and stepmother, Marina Turner Bryan.25,26
     He moved to Clarksville with his father and stepmother in 1851.27,28,29

His Education --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---

The Castle Building, Stewart College
photo courtesy Rhodes College Archives, Memphis

     Robert attended local schools, then Stewart College, on the site now occupied by Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, in 1854-6. That school, after several name changes and reorganizations, moved to Memphis in 1925 and is now known as Rhodes College.30,31,32
     After completion of his schooling, he became a rodman on the Memphis, Clarksville and Louisville Railroad. He soon became assistant engineer on that road. In 1859 and 1860 he was City Engineer of Clarksville.30

Serving at Fort Donelson --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     With the outbreak of the Civil War, Robert joined the Confederate Army. He mustered in 12 Aug 1861 at Clarksville, Tennessee, as a private in Captain T. W. Beaumont's Company.33 In the fall of 1861 this company, among others, assembled at Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland River about thirty miles below Clarksville.34,35 On 10 Nov 1861 he was detached from the company by order of Liet. Col. R. W. McGavock, commander of Fort Donelson, and placed in charge of ordnance and stores at the post. When Gen. Tilghman assumed command 23 Dec 1861 Robert was appointed by him as Ordnance Officer to his command.36,37
     Robert's status during this period was irregular, at least. On Christmas Day, 1861, the companies at Fort Donelson organized into a regiment, the 50th Tennessee Infantry. Capt. Beaumont's company became Company A in the new regiment. By this time Robert had been detached to the Ordnance Department, but he continued to be carried on the muster rolls of the 50th Tennessee, marked as "absent, assigned to duty in Ordnance Dept.," initially showing his rank as private and later as 2nd lieutenant. Two different officers, in their reports of the battle Fort Donelson, commended him, addressing him as "Lieutenant Cobb, of the Ordnance Department" in one case and "Lieut. Robert Cobb, of Tennessee, ordnance officer" in the other. During his time at Fort Donelson he signed receipts and requisitions as "Act. Ordnance Officer." But he never actually received a commission as an officer.38,39,40,41
     Ft. Donelson was reached by Union forces under Brig. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant on 12 Feb 1862. Over the following three days the Union forces surrounded the fort and pressed their attack, aided by gunboats coming up the river. In the early morning hours of 16 Feb, Confederate Brig. Gen. John B. Floyd, seeing the situation as hopeless, turned over command to Brig. Gen. Gideon Johnson Pillow, who turned command over to Brig. Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner, leaving him to surrender the fort while they escaped. With no white flag available, Robert, as ordnance officer, produced a white bedsheet which was run up at daylight. Many men escaped, including Col. Nathan Bedford Forrest and 700 of his cavalrymen, and nearly half of the 50th Tennessee, including Robert.42,43,44,45

Assigned to His Cousin's Battery --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     After his escape from Fort Donelson Robert made his way to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and reported for duty to Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston there. On 22 Feb 1862 he was assigned as Junior 1st Lieut. in R. Cobb's Battalion (Maj. Robert H. Cobb, commander of that unit, was his double cousin, son of father's brother and his mother's sister). He remained in the battalion until after the Battle of Shiloh, which occurred 6 Apr 1862.46,47
     There is no record of his duties while serving in Cobb's Battery. However his short time there probably contributed to confusion between him and his cousin during the war and afterwards, continuing among Civil War buffs today.48,49,50

Transferred to the Ordnance Department --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     He was assigned by Gen. Beauregard to report to the Chief of Ordinance of the Western Department, and reported there 13 Apr 1862, at Corinth, Mississippi.51 On 28 Apr 1862 he was requested to go to Mobile, Alabama, to collect ordnance stores there and bring them to Corinth.52
     By 28 Jun 1862 he was Ordinance Officer of Artillery at the Verona, Mississippi, Depot.53 By 15 Dec 1862 he was Ordinance Officer at Tullahoma, Tennessee. Records are unclear as to when he was assigned there.54 By 25 Aug 1862 he was Ordnance Officer in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in charge of a train of ordnance that accompanied Gen. Wilther's division.55

Trying to Collect His Pay --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     By mid-1862 his irregular status had become a serious issue for him: he could not collect any pay. When he finally got around to presenting his papers to his paymaster he was told that without a commission he could not be paid. He began collecting statements from his former commanding officers that documented his service as an ordnance officer. He wrote to his old family friend, Willis Benson Machen, 25 Aug 1862 requesting his help in obtaining a commission so he could collect his pay. He said he had been in the service 12 months, paying his own expenses and had not asked for pay until he arrived in Chattanooga. He said he had spent $200 raising Capt. Beaumont's Company, and was now out of funds. Col. Machen's response has not been found.56
     Robert wrote to headquarters 1 Oct 1862 from Bryansville, Kentucky, about his pay as an Ordinance Officer. The response, dated 7 Nov 1862, stated it appears he had no appointment in the Army, and it was too late to confer an appointment except after examination, which has been ordered. On 30 Nov 1862 he requested, from Murfreesboro, to be examined for a position as 1st Lieut. of Ordinance and Artillery. No record of him taking that examination has been found.57
     His commanding officer wrote to headquarters in Richmond on 10 Dec 1862 seeking authority to pay him from 25 Dec 1861. Headquarters responded six days later authorizing payment at the rate for a Lieutenant for the time he was actually on ordnance duty. A voucher was issued to pay him $1,095 for the period 25 Dec 1861 to 1 Jan 1863.58

Becoming a Pontoonier --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     On 1 Jan 1863 he was ordered to report for duty to Capt. E. B. Sayers, Chief Engineer in Lt. Gen. Polk's Corps, Army of Tennessee. He still had no commission, but was an acting 1st lieutenant. He was being paid at the rate of $100 per month.59 On 13 Apr 1863 he again wrote to Col. Machen, from Shelbyville, Tennessee. He was responding to a letter from him dated 14 Mar, and again asked for help in receiving a commission. It is not clear whether Machen was responsible, but several officers did write letters recommending Robert as 1st lieutenant in a company of sappers and miners then being formed in Lt. Gen. Polk's corps (sappers and miners are engineers who construct trenches and tunnels to aid in breaching defensive structures).60
Capt. Robert Linah Cobb
     Robert was appointed 17 Jun 1863 as commanding officer of company C in the 3rd Engineer Troops. While the company was known as Lieut. R. L. Cobb's Company, he remained an acting 1st lieutenant. No record has been found of his ever being commissioned as a lieutenant.61 The newly formed 3rd Regiment of Engineer Troop including two companies of pontooniers, furnished with a train of boats and bridge material. Lt. Cobb was assigned to one of these. These units had sufficient boats to bridge small streams, but in order to put Gen. Hood across the Tennessee river at Florence, 30 Oct to 2 Nov 1863, they had to supplement the pontoons with a trestle bridge.62
     He apparently grew impatient of receiving a commission as lieutenant and decided to pursue a captaincy. On 11 Dec 1863, from Dalton, Georgia, he wrote to G. A. Henry, Confederate States Senator from Clarksville, Tennessee, seeking his support in obtaining a captaincy of his company. Senator Henry was well placed to help, having been a law school classmate of President Jefferson Davis, and a member of the finance and military committees in the Senate. The Senator did write a letter of recommendation 17 Dec 1893.63,64
     Robert was appointed 30 Apr 1864 as Captain in Company G, 3rd Regiment of Engineers.65 He was nominated as a Captain to the Confederate Congress on 24 May 1864 by President Jefferson Davis, to take that rank from 30 Apr 1864. The nomination was confirmed 6 Jun.66,67 He was the youngest captain in that corps.68,69
     After Gen. Hood's disastrous defeat at Nashville on 16 Dec 1864, the pontoon unit put him over the Duck River but had to abandon the cords and decking of the bridge. When Gen. Hood announced he would try to re-cross the Tennessee at Bainbridge Capt. Cobb was dispatched with a company, mounted on mules, to Decatur to bring down if possible several pontoon boats that had been captured there. The river was too deep to permit building a trestle bridge quickly, and there were about half enough boats to span the stream. With the sound of artillery in the distance as the rear guard was being pressed by the victorious foe, Cobb's unit appeared with the boats, having successfully navigated the hazardous shoals in high water, permitting Hood's army to cross.70,71,72
     On 31 Dec 1864 a pontoon train under his command was captured near Nauvoo, Alabama, by Federal forces under Brig. Gen. W. D. Whipple's command. The train "extended for five miles, and consisted of 78 pontoon boats and about 200 wagons, with all the necessary accouterments, material, engineering instruments, etc." Gen. Whipple reported he would have been glad to bring the train back to Union lines, since it "was an exceedingly well appointed one." But the condition of the mules, the mountainous terrain, and the presence nearby of enemy cavalry of three times the strength of his forces prevented that. So he burned it. A few prisoners were captured but no mention was made of any officers.73
     Gen. Hood resigned his command in Jan 1865, and the remains of his army were commanded briefly by Gen. Taylor, then by Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, being transferred to the Carolinas. Robert was listed on the rolls of those Gen. Johnston surrendered a 26 Apr 1865 and paroled at Catawba Bridge, South Carolina, on 5 May 1865.74

His Return to Engineering --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---

Improved Rail Fastening
from his 1874 patent

     After the war, Robert returned to the practice of engineering. For a time, he engaged in a joint practice with his brother-in-law, John Baker Tapscott, under the firm name of Cobb & Tapscott. In Oct 1865 they advertised their services as Civil and Topographical Engineers, Architects and Surveyors, in Clarksville. They said they would "attend promptly to any business in their profession in this or the adjoining states. Special attention paid to surveying and mapping farms."75
     Robert soon resumed his career with the railroads, returning to the Memphis, Clarksville, and Louisville Railroad as Division Engineer. In 1867 he was appointed Chief Engineer of the Winchester and Alabama Railroad, which also later became part of the Louisville and Nashville system. Two years later he became Assistant Engineer of the Memphis and Ohio Railroad, then a Division Engineer with the Memphis and Little Rock Railroad, where he remained until 1873, serving part of that time as Acting Chief Engineer.76,77
     On 18 Feb 1873 Robert, together with Charles W. Tift, both shown as from Memphis, Tennessee, filed an application for a patent on an improved fastening for joints between lengths of rail. The invention used a wedge bar instead of nuts to secure the bolts that hold the joint together. Their patent was issued 24 Mar 1874, number 149, 002.78
     In 1873 he conducted mining operations at Kellogg, Arkansas, and later in Mexico. He returned to railroad work in 1876 as a member of the engineering staff of the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railway.76,79
     Robert married Virginia A. Tuck, daughter of Dr. Davis Green Tuck and Elizabeth M. Toot, on 3 Jan 1877, at the residence of her sister Sarah, on Poplar Blvd., Shelby Co., Tennessee, with Rev. S. B. Surratt officiating.13,14,15,16
     Robert and Jennie settled Little Rock, Arkansas, after their marriage.80 They appeared on the 1880 Federal Census of Little Rock, Pulaski Co., Arkansas, at the Capital Hotel, enumerated 8 Jun 1880. Their daughter Irene was listed as living with them.4
Capt. Cobb's tombstone
photo by author
     He was the Chief Engineer of the Texas and St. Louis Railway, later the St. Louis, Arkansas, and Texas, in 1881 and 1882. He then spent four years manufacturing machinery at Little Rock, Arkansas.76 During his tenure the former Indiana, Alabama and Texas line, previously completed only from Clarksville part way to Princeton, Kentucky, was completed to that city. In the process numerous stations were established, with three of them named for the family. Gracey, in Christian Co., 7½ miles west of Hopkinsville, was established in 1887, supposedly named for his sister's father-in-law. Cobb, in Caldwell Co., 8½ miles southeast of Princeton, was established late the same year, apparently named for him or his sister. Her son, Julien Frank Gracey, was the superintendent of the line at the time. Julian, six miles west of Hopkinsville and established in 1888, was apparently named for him.81
     His wife, with their daughter and presumably their young son, moved to San Antonio, Texas, in the fall of 1885 in hopes that the climate there would improve her health.82,83,84
     On the evening of 24 Apr 1886 Robert received a telegram that his daughter Irene was dangerously ill. He took the first train to go to her and arrived just an hour before she died.85
     His wife died on 17 May 1886 in Clarksville, Montgomery Co., Tennessee, at the home of his sister, where she had been staying since the burial of their daughter two weeks before.86,87
     In 1886 he was appointed Chief Engineer of the Indiana, Alabama and Texas Railroad. When that line was absorbed by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad in 1887 he became the Chief Engineer of construction for the line.76,88,89
     In 1890 he was appointed Chief Engineer of the Clarksville Mineral Railroad.76 In 1892 he became Chief Engineer the Ohio and Southern Railroad, taking charge of the engineering department, headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio.76,90,91 While he was there he boarded at the Arcade Hotel. He suffered "an attack of grip" (apparently grippe, a term for several flu-like diseases) in the winter of 1894 from which he never recovered, and returned to Clarksville in May 1895.92,93
     He was a member of the Knights of Pythias of Little Rock, the Royal Arcanum, one of the oldest fraternal benefit societies in the United States, and Forbes Bivouac, an association of Confederate veterans.94 He elected as a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers on 2 Jan 1890.76
     Robert died on 2 Jun 1895 in Clarksville, Montgomery Co., Tennessee, at age 55, at the residence of his sister Irene, after having contacted what was then reported to be diphtheria, in Cleveland in March.17,18,19
     His funeral services were at the Trinity Church (Episcopal), conducted by Rev. R. E. L. Craig. There was a "profusion of floral offerings of the most appropriate and costly designs." The cemetery procession and services were conducted by Forbes Bivouac.95 He was buried on 4 Jun 1895 in Greenwood Cemetery, Clarksville, Tennessee, in the Cobb family lot.20,21

Children:
     Children with Virginia A. Tuck:

Citations

  1. [S2305] Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, pg 545, shows name as Robert Linah Cobb.
  2. [S3048] "Sudden Death of Dr. Joshua Cobb," The Courier-Journal, 8 Apr 1879, shows name as Capt. Robert L. Cobb.
  3. [S642] Joshua Cobb household, 1850 U.S. Census, Stewart Co., Tennessee, shows name as Robert Cobb.
  4. [S390] R. L. Cobb household, 1880 U.S. Census, Pulaski Co., Arkansas.
  5. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879.
  6. [S1023] "Death of Mrs. Cobb," Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf, 9 Dec 1890, shows Capt. R. L. Cobb as his son by a former marriage.
  7. [S642] Joshua Cobb household, 1850 U.S. Census, Stewart Co., Tennessee, shows them in same household, apparently as parent and child.
  8. [S3048] "Sudden Death of Dr. Joshua Cobb," The Courier-Journal, 8 Apr 1879.
  9. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 268.
  10. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, Robert L. Cobb to Col. Machen, 13 Apr 1863, shows date, county, and state.
  11. [S2305] Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, pg 545, shows date, place as Cumberland Iron Works, and state.
  12. [S642] Joshua Cobb household, 1850 U.S. Census, Stewart Co., Tennessee, shows age 10 and state, as Tennessee.
  13. [S8770] "Married; Cobb-Tuck," Clarksville Weeklyl Chronicle, 13 Jan 1877, shows married on 3d inst., residence, address, city, state, and officant, as Rev. S. B. Surratt.
  14. [S1217] Robert L. Cobb and Jennie A. Tuck, marriage bond, shows date and officiant, as L. T. Surratt, M.G.
  15. [S1024] "Capt. R. L. Cobb Dead," Daily Tobacco Leaf, 3 Jun 1895, shows he married abt. 1877 daughter of Dr. Tuck and sister of Mrs. Thomas H. Elliott.
  16. [S330] Virginia Adelaide Cobb, silver serving piece with twelve small spoons, inscribed on the front JAC (Virginia was commonly known as Jenny), and on the back 1877, which seems likely as her marriage the date based on the birth date of their first child. See also email correspondence between Deborah (Cobb) Manley and author, "Hard Evidence" 23 and 26 Apr 2000.
  17. [S1024] "Capt. R. L. Cobb Dead," Daily Tobacco Leaf, 3 Jun 1895, shows "yesterday about 12:30 o'clock p.m." at the residence of his sister and cause of death.
  18. [S2305] Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, pg 546, shows he had an attack of grip from which he never recovered, and died 2 Jun at his early home in Clarksville.
  19. [S4413] R. L. Cobb grave marker, Greenwood Cemetery, shows date.
  20. [S4413] R. L. Cobb grave marker, Greenwood Cemetery.
  21. [S1025] "Springfield, Ohio Directories, 1890-94," Ancestry.com, shows funeral at 10 o'clock "this morning" with interment following.
  22. [S634] Joshua Cobb household, 1840 U.S. Census, Steward Co., Tennessee.
  23. [S1998] Julia Ann Cobb and daughter Ione grave marker, Eddyville Cemetery, shows date.
  24. [S3048] "Sudden Death of Dr. Joshua Cobb," The Courier-Journal, 8 Apr 1879, shows year and place, as Cumberland Iron Works.
  25. [S642] Joshua Cobb household, 1850 U.S. Census, Stewart Co., Tennessee.
  26. [S643] Joshua Cobb, owner, 1850 U.S. Census, Stewart Co., Tennessee, slave schedule.
  27. [S1015] "Death of Dr. Cobb," The Chronicle, 12 Apr 1879, shows he moved to Clarksville in 1851.
  28. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 267, shows iron businesses, and retired about 1866.
  29. [S944] Davis, Folk Finders, citing Clarksville City Directory 1859-1860, shows occupation as physician and address.
  30. [S2305] Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, pg 545.
  31. [S2307] Gates, "RE: Records from Stewart College in Clarksville?," e-mail to author, 29 Jun 2009, reporting that an alumni directory which covers the period through 1898 shows Robert L. Cobb is listed as attending Stewart College in 1854 and 1856.
  32. [S2306] "Historical Summary", shows history of the college.
  33. [S8938] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Tennessee, Company Muster Roll card, undated.
  34. [S8939] Lindsley, Military Annals of Tennessee, pg 558, C. W. Tyler, "Fiftieth Tenneessee Infantry," shows various companies were stationed at Fort Donelson.
  35. [S8938] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Tennessee, Company Muster Roll card, 16 Sep 1861 to __, shows some of the companies had previously served in a temporary battalion.
  36. [S8938] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Tennessee, Company Muster Roll card, 16 Sep 1861 to __, shows dept. and date.
  37. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, R. L. Cobb to W. B. Machen, 25 Aug 1862, shows initial appointment, appointment of Gen. Tilghman; certificate bly Lloyd Tilghman 16 Aug 1862.
  38. [S8941] The War of the Rebellion, series I, vol VII, pg 390, "Report of Lieut. Col. Milton A. Haynes," 24 Mar 1862; and pg 399, "Report of Capt. R. R. Ross," 16 Oct 1862.
  39. [S8939] Lindsley, Military Annals of Tennessee, pg 558, C. W. Tyler, "Fiftieth Tenneessee Infantry," shows organization of 50 Tennessee, Capt Beaumont's company.
  40. [S8938] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Tennessee, Company Muster Roll card, 16 Sep 1861 to __, shows rank as pvt, date, and assigned to ordnance; Company Muster Roll card, 10 Nov 1861 to 1 Aug 1862_, shows rank as 2nd Liet.
  41. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, R. L. Cobb to W. B. Machen, 25 Aug 1862, shows he had no commission; multiple recepts and requsitions dated Nov 1861 to 10 Feb 1862.
  42. [S1265] Wikipedia, online, "Battle of Fort Donelson," viewed Nov 2019, describes overall battle, and escape of Floyd, Pillow, Forrest and his troops.
  43. [S8939] Lindsley, Military Annals of Tennessee, pg 560, C. W. Tyler, "Fiftieth Tenneessee Infantry," shows Ordnance Sargent Cobb's white sheet, escape of half of 50th.
  44. [S8938] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Tennessee, Company Muster Roll card, 10 Nov 1861 to 1 Aug 1862 and 1 Aug to 31 Oct 1862, show him as absent without leave; 27 Jan 1864 shows escaped at surrender and not rejoined.
  45. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, R. L. Cobb to W. B. Machen, 25 Aug 1862, shows escaped at surrender.
  46. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, R. L. Cobb to W. B. Machen, 25 Aug 1862, shows reporting to general in Murfeesboro; order 22 Feb 1862, in Cobb's Battalion until Battle of Shiloh.
  47. [S8942] R. L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Kentucky, list of commissioned officers, shows date of commission as ___ 186_, includes note from Capt. Cobb with general's name and date.
  48. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, Robt. L. Cobb to G. A Henry, 16 Jan 1864, addressing confusion between himself and his cousin.
  49. [S8943] Walden, "A Post War Memoir", includes transcript of typescript based on information from Julian F. Gracey, husband of Robert L. Cobb's sister, in which he consistently shows captain of the brigade as R. L. Cobb.
  50. [S1265] Wikipedia, online, "1st Kentucky Artillery," viewed Nov 2019, shows Robert L. Cobb as captain after Lyon.
  51. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, certificate of Capt. H. Oladowski, shows date and city; R. L. Cobb to W. B. Machen, 25 Aug 1862, shows by order of Gen. Beauregard.
  52. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, H. Oladowski to Br. Gen S. Jerdan, 28 Apr1862.
  53. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, R. L. Cobb to Col. H. Oladowski, 28 Jun 1862, signs as Ordnance Officer of Artillery, Veronia Depot.
  54. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, R. L. Cobb to Col. H. Oladowski, 15 Dec 1862, signs as Ordnance Officer, dated at Ordnance office, Tullahoma.
  55. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, R. L. Cobb to W. B. Machen, 25 Aug 1862.
  56. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, statement of Brig. Gen. B. R. Johnson, 9 Jun 1862; statement of Capt. H. Oladowski, 8 Jul 1862; statement of Brig. Gen. Lloyd Telghman, 16 Aug 1862; R. L. Cobb to W. B. Machen, 25 Aug 1862.
  57. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, chief of ordnance, Richmond, to Capt. H. Oladowski, 7 Nov 1862; R. L. Cobb to Col. H. Oladowski, 30 Nov 1862.
  58. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, Capt. Thos L. Bayne to Col. H. Oladowski, 16 Dec 1862; voucher 13 Jan 1863.
  59. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, Robert L. Cobb to Col. Machen, 13 Apr 1863, shows date and unit, and acting status with no commission; pay vouchers 1 May 1863, 18 Jun 1863, and 30 Jun 1863; report of staff officers card, 10 Mar 1863, shows no rank, not commissioned, acting by authority of Genl. Bragg; tri-monthly return card, 20 Jun 1863, shows 1st Lieut.; receipt roll card Jun - Jul 1863, shows Act. 1st Lt.
  60. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, Robert L. Cobb to Col. Machen, 13 Apr 1863; Capt. Edward B. Tayor to R. L Cobb, 14 Apr 1863; Capt. George B. Pickett to Col. J. F. Gilmer, 23 Jun 1863; Capt. Edward B. Tayorto Col. J. F. Gilmer, 23 Jul 1863; and Capt. Edward B. Tayorto Col. J. F. Gilmer, 28 Jul 1863, conveying comments of Gen. Polk.
  61. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, company muster roll card 31 Oct 1863, shows name of company and date; receipt roll cards Oct 1863 and Nov 1863, show rank as Act. 1st Lt.
  62. [S1027] "A Tribute to a Hero," Daily Tobacco Leaf, 13 Jun 1895, describes organization of pontoonier corps, support of Gen. Hood, and Cobb's role, noting that the author was the senior captain of the unit.
  63. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, Robert L. Cobb to Hon. G. A. Henry, 11 Dec 1863; G. A. Henry to Col. Gorges, 17 Dec 1863.
  64. [S1265] Wikipedia, online, "Gustavus Adolphus Henry Sr.," viewed Nov 2019, shows Henry's background.
  65. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, register card, citing Confed. Arch, Chap. 1, file no. 92, pg 345, shows date; register of appointments card, shows dates of appointment, confirmation, and effectiveness.
  66. [S2965] United States Congressional Serial Set, Senate Doc. No. 234, 58th Congress, 2nd session, Journal of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865, vol 4, 24 May 1864, pp 87-9, shows Robert L. Cobb of Kentucky nominated to rank of captain; pg 165, Congress consented.
  67. [S4413] R. L. Cobb grave marker, Greenwood Cemetery, shows Capt. C.S.A.
  68. [S1024] "Capt. R. L. Cobb Dead," Daily Tobacco Leaf, 3 Jun 1895, shows he was captain in charge of pontoon bridges, most youthful captain of that department.
  69. [S1027] "A Tribute to a Hero," Daily Tobacco Leaf, 13 Jun 1895, shows he was youngest man of that rank in the corps.
  70. [S1027] "A Tribute to a Hero," Daily Tobacco Leaf, 13 Jun 1895, describes support of Gen. Hood, and Cobb's role, noting that the author was the senior captain of the unit.
  71. [S1028] "In Memorandum," Daily Tobacco Leaf, 3 Jul 1895, describes and Cobb's role capturing pontoon boots in support of Gen. Hood's retreat.
  72. [S8941] The War of the Rebellion, series I, vol XLX, part II, pg 541, "Report of Brig. Gen. W. D. Whipple," 7 Jan 1865, shows Hood crossing Bainbridge Sunday morning, finishing Tuesday evening, and they had finished taking up the pontoon Wednesday morning.
  73. [S8941] The War of the Rebellion, series I, vol XLX, part II, pg 541, "Report of Brig. Gen. W. D. Whipple," 7 Jan 1865.
  74. [S8940] Robert L. Cobb, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Confederate Government, mustor roll card of officers and men paroled.
  75. [S3364] Advertisement, Cobb & Tapscott, Clarksville Weekly Chronicle, 27 Oct 1865.
  76. [S2305] Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, pg 546.
  77. [S1024] "Capt. R. L. Cobb Dead," Daily Tobacco Leaf, 3 Jun 1895, shows he engaged in civil engineering after the war, and removed to Little Rock.
  78. [S4540] Tuft and Cobb, Patent No. 149,002.
  79. [S390] R. L. Cobb household, 1880 U.S. Census, Pulaski Co., Arkansas, shows his occupation as civil engineer for the L. R. & F. S. RR.
  80. [S1024] "Capt. R. L. Cobb Dead," Daily Tobacco Leaf, 3 Jun 1895, shows he removed there shortly after their marriage and he stayed until after her death.
  81. [S3425] Rennick, Kentucky Place Names, pp 63, 120, and 156, shows location and date of establishment of each station, and who named for, in the case of Cobb showing "either for the superintendent of the rr or a prosperous and influential family in neighboring Lyon Co." However Julian Gracey was superintendent, and the prominent Cobb's in Lyon county had mostly died or moved away some two decades before.
  82. [S8703] Irene Cobb obituary, The Daily Democrat, shows Mrs. Cobb had been in Texas several months on account of her health.
  83. [S8702] "A Telling Criticism," The San Antonio Light, 4 Dec 1885, shows Irene as a new arrival.
  84. [S1020] "Local News," Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf, 18 May 1886, shows she died of consumption.
  85. [S8703] Irene Cobb obituary, The Daily Democrat.
  86. [S1020] "Local News," Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf, 18 May 1886, shows "yesterday," cause of death, place as Capt. Gracey's, and that she had been staying there since the death of Irene.
  87. [S4415] Jennie Tuck Cobb grave marker, Greenwood Cemetery, shows date.
  88. [S1024] "Capt. R. L. Cobb Dead," Daily Tobacco Leaf, 3 Jun 1895, shows service with Louisville & Nashville.
  89. [S645] Titus, Picturesque Clarksville, pg 268, shows he held L&NRR position in 1887, when the book was published.
  90. [S1024] "Capt. R. L. Cobb Dead," Daily Tobacco Leaf, 3 Jun 1895, shows service with Ohio & Southwestern.
  91. [S1025] "Springfield, Ohio Directories, 1890-94," Ancestry.com, record for R. L. Cobb, 1893, 94, shows location NEC Limestone and Washington, Springfield, OH, Occupation: chief engineer, Business Name: Ohio Southern Railroad.
  92. [S1025] "Springfield, Ohio Directories, 1890-94," Ancestry.com, record for R. L. Cobb, 1893, 94, shows second location: boards Arcade Hotel.
  93. [S2305] Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, pg 546, shows he had an attack of grip in the winter of 1894, returned South in May 1895.
  94. [S1024] "Capt. R. L. Cobb Dead," Daily Tobacco Leaf, 3 Jun 1895.
  95. [S1025] "Springfield, Ohio Directories, 1890-94," Ancestry.com, shows funeral at 10 o'clock "this morning" with interment following, gives account of funeral.
  96. [S1018] "Local News," Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf, 4 May 1886.
  97. [S1067] Robt L. Cobb Jr., Record of Births in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas.
  98. [S1069] Dr. Robert Linah Cobb, Certificate of Death.