Dr. Davis Green Tuck1,2,3

ID# 1838, (1793 - 1863)
MotherRebecca [surname unknown]4,5 (1776 - 4 Aug 1855)

Key Events:

Birth: 30 Dec 1793, Halifax Co., Virginia6,7,8
Marriage: 11 Mar 1818, Halifax Co., Virginia, Elizabeth M. Toot (26 Nov 1800 - 29 Dec 1873)9,10
Death: 3 Feb 1863, Christian Co., Kentucky6,11,12
Burial: the Tuck-Elliott Family Cemetery, Lafayette, Christian Co., Kentucky13
ChartsDescendants of Dr. Davis Green Tuck
Descendants of David Dutt/Toot
AncestryThe Tuck Family
The Dutt/Toot Family

Copyright Notice

Narrative:

     Dr. Davis Green Tuck was born on 30 Dec 1793 in Halifax Co., Virginia.6,7,8 Davis attended the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania in the 1812-13 and 1816-17 terms, but apparently did not graudate.14,15 His education was interrupted by service in the War of 1912. He was nominated by President James Madison as a surgeon's mate in the U.S. Navy on 30 Nov 1814, one of 34 men nominated for that position that day. The U. S. Senate consented to all those nominations on Saturday, 10 Dec. He served in that position at least until the end of 1815.16,17
     Davis married Elizabeth M. Toot, daughter of Adam Toot and Sarah King, on 11 Mar 1818 in Halifax Co., Virginia.9,10

His Medical Practice --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     It is not clear to what extent he was engaged in the practice of medicine. A published genealogy mentions it, and his record in the 1850 census includes the title "Dr." But it appears farming was his primary occupation - that's what appears as his stated occupation in every source found. It is clear that he was very successful at that profession. In 1820, at the age of 26, he was recorded as farming, apparently a part of his father's property, and already owned six slaves. The extent of his holdings steadily increased. By 1850 his slaves numbered 41, and in 1860 his real estate was valued at $39,000, and other holdings at $55,200, both significant sums at that time.18,19,20,21,22,23

Inventions in Flue Curing Tobacco --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---

From his 1831 patent

     He conducted experiments related to the cultivation of tobacco which received widespread recognition. Virginia farmers began experimenting with flue systems to cure tobacco as early as 1809, and Davis is recorded as a prominent inventor in the field. He received a patent 1 Oct 1830 for his method of drying and curing tobacco, "founded upon the principle, that in order to preserve the valuable qualities of vegetable substances, which are to be desiccated, the process ought to be effected within a limited time, in order to prevent spontaneous decomposition... and must be carried on at temperatures within the absolute control of the operator." His method, it was said, was "sufficiently simple to be carried into effect by ordinary hands.24,25,26
     In 13 Jun 1831 he received a patent for the invention of a system of flues or stoves used to carry out his process. The system allowed applying heat to cure, or dry, the tobacco while keeping the smoke away from the product. He said he usually constructed his flues from common brick, but they could be made from stone, iron, fire brick, slabs, tiles, or other materials. Flue curing reliably produced the favored "yellow" cure which brought premium prices. Flue curing remains the most commonly used method, producing "bright tobacco" which is mainly used in cigarettes. Until his development the "fire curing" process was used, which exposes the tobacco to the smoke and produces a darker product. That method remains in use mainly for pipe mixtures, snuff, and chewing tobacco.27,28,29
     An 1889 publication by the Virginia State Board of Agriculture called him the originator of the yellow tobacco industry for inaugurating the practice of curing tobacco without smoke. But it also acknowledged that his "Tuck Flue" design had serious defects – it tended to explode and burn the barns. As a result it was not widely used until improved designs made the practice safer some years later.30,31 In fact it seems that the process was so little used that when William T. Ballow, husband of a niece of his wife, introduced flue curing using tin flues in South Boston in 1869 he was given credit for discovering flue curing.32
     Nevertheless, Davis continued to receive credit for his innovations into modern times. A 1953 article from a Rocky Mount, North Carolina newspaper stated "...it seems fairly certain that the first notable method of curing by such means was evolved by Dr. Davis G. Tuck of Love's Shop, Halifax County." It notes that Davis "recommended a close, well-built barn. For greater convenience in adding wood, the furnace was made to open outside the barn." It continues "For uniform regulation of the heat, Tuck, apparently the first to do so, used a thermometer which was attached to cords operated by pulleys so that the curer could stand on the outside and draw the thermometer from the center of the barn to a small glass window."33

Living in Halifax Co. --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     He appeared on the 1820 Federal Census of Marseilles, Halifax Co., Virginia, with a household consisting of one white male age 16-18 (unknown), and one age 18-26 (himself), one female under age 10 (daughter Sarah), one age 16-26 (wife Elizabeth M. Toot), and one age 26-48 (probably Rebecca, who may have been his mother but is more likely his aunt). There were also 4 male slaves and 2 female slaves. One person in the household was reported as engaged in agriculture.3
     Davis was named one of the executors in the will of Coleman Tuck, relationship unknown, dated 5 Jan 1821. Among the listed duties of the executors was to collect "the balance of the money due me" from Davis.34
     On 14 Oct 1822 Davis and Elizabeth were given 280 acres of land in Halifax Co. by her parents, Sarah King and Adam Toot.35,36 Curiously, the deed was not recorded until 8 Aug 1826, and the property, on Miller Rd., remained in Adam's name in the tax lists until the following year. Perhaps his continuing to pay the taxes, $1.62 per year, was part of the gift? The property was appraised at $7.20 per acre, including the buildings, for a total value of $2,016, of which $360 was the value of buildings.37
     Davis and Elizabeth seem to have adopted William, who was born three years before their marriage, between 1820 when he was not included in their household and 1830 when he apparently was. It was likely an informal adoption, as he used the surname Edmondson through college, but after that used Tuck. As adults he and their other children referred to each other as siblings.38,39,40,41,42
     Davis seems to have been regarded as a an upstanding member of the community, and acted as a trustee in a number of transactions. On 20 Jan 1827 he was made trustee for Mary Carlton and her children. She had deeded her half interest in a parcel of land in Sussex Co. that she had inherited from her father, Thomas Asent, to John Y. Mason. In exchange, her husband, Edward, of Sussex Co., gave Davis six slaves, to be held in trust for Mary and her children. But the slaves were to remain in the possession of Edward until Mary "required" that they be transferred to her and the children. There is no indication why Davis was acting as trustee for parties living three counties to the east.43 The Virginia General Assembly, noting that Davis had moved out of state and had been succeeded as trustee by John S. Lewellen, passed an act on 12 Dec 1833 authorizing the Halifax Co. court to approve the sale of the slaves if it found that to be in the best interests of the mother and children.44
     On 10 Mar 1828 Davis and Benjamin Hunt were given a mortgage by Miles Hall on ten horses, two road waggons, and associated gear, to secure debts totaling $375 Hall owed to William Fitzgerald. If Hall failed to pay the debts Davis and Hunt were to auction the property and pay off the debts with the proceeds.45
     On 25 Jan 1830 Davis took a deed of trust from Royall Daniel for 298 acres formerly belonging to William C. Tucker on the waters of the Banister River in Halifax Co., to secure a debt of $1,699.37½ that Daniel owed Tucker. If the debt was not repaid by 1 Sep 1833 Davis was to sell the property at auction and use the proceeds to settle the debt.46 About the same time Davis took a similar deed of trust from Frances Daniel for 150¾ acres formerly belonging to Tucker on the waters of the Banister River in Halifax Co. to secure a debt of $678.37½ that she owed Tucker. The relationship between her and Royall Daniel is unknown, but he was one of the witnesses to her deed. They appear separately in the 1830 census, so were not spouses but perhaps siblings or in-laws.47,48 Davis released the deed of trust by Royall Daniel 10 Aug 1831, because the debt had been repaid.49
     Davis appeared on the 1830 Federal Census of Halifax Co., Virginia, with a household consisting of one white male under age 5 (son Walter), two age 15 - 20 (adopted son William and another) and two age 20 - 30 (too old to be his sons, perhaps brothers?), one age 30 - 40 (himself), one female age 5 - 10 (daughter Rebecca), one age 10 - 15 (Sarah) one age 20 - 30 (wife Elizabeth), and one age 50 - 60 (probably Rebecca, who may have been his mother or his aunt). There were also 11 male slaves and 11 female slaves.50

Moving to Kentucky --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Davis and Elizabeth sold the 280-acre parcel given them by her father, to Daniel L. Dunscomb for $1,680, on 9 Nov 1830.51 On 13 Mar 1832 Davis and Elizabeth sold a 33½-acre parcel on a branch of the Banister River in Halifax Co. to Sarah Tuck for $54.37. He had previously purchased this parcel from her, apparently in 1831 since it first appears in his name on the tax lists the following year. It is known how she was related to him. The land was valued at $3.60 per acre for a total of $120.60, with no value for buildings.52,53
     Davis and Elizabeth moved to Christian Co., Kentucky, in 1832 or 1833.54,55 Davis appeared on the 1840 Federal Census of Christian Co., Kentucky, enumerated 1840, with a household consisting of two white males under age 5 (sons Henry and Richard), one age 5 - 10 (Walter), and one age 40 - 50 (himself), one female under 5 (daughter Elizabeth), two age 15 - 20 (Rebecca and Sarah, although Sarah was then 22 years old), one age 30 - 40 (wife Elizabeth), and one age 60 - 70 (Rebecca [surname unknown], who may have been his mother or his aunt). There were also 24 male slaves and 15 female slaves. Twenty-four members of the household were reported as engaging in agriculture.56
     Davis and Elizabeth M. Toot appeared on the 1850 Federal Census of District 1, Christian Co., Kentucky, enumerated 7 Aug 1850, reporting $19,500 in real estate and 41 slaves, of which 13 were females. Their children Walter, Henry, Elizabeth, Richard, Paul, Martha and Virginia were listed as living with them, as was Rebecca [surname unknown], age 74, who may have been his mother or another relative.57,22
     Davis and Elizabeth appeared on the 1860 Federal Census of Hopkinsville, Christian Co., Kentucky, enumerated 9 Aug 1860, reporting $39,000 in real estate and $55,200 in personal property. He also reported owing 30 slaves, ranging in age from 11 months to 60 years, housed in 7 slave houses. Their children Richard, Paul, Martha and Virginia were listed as living with them.58,59
Dr. Tuck's tombstone
photo by authors

His Will --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Davis left a holographic will (handwritten by the testator and not witnessed) dated 25 Mar 1861. In it he left $8,000 each to his youngest children, Virginia, Martha and Paul. He left Richard $6,000 and Henry $5,000 in addition to the girl Chaney and other property he had already received. He left his daughter Elizabeth $4,000 in addition to the fellow Jordan and woman Betsy and her child and other property she had already received. His wife, Elizabeth M. Toot, was to receive all the balance of his estate for her life, after which it was to be equally divided between the six named children. He said that his daughter Sarah and the children of his daughter Rebecca were already well provided for and were to receive nothing more. He named his son, Richard and his son-in-law, Thomas Herbert Elliott, as executors.60
     Davis died on 3 Feb 1863 in Christian Co., Kentucky, at age 69.6,11,12 He was buried in the Tuck-Elliott Family Cemetery, Lafayette, Christian Co., Kentucky.13
     His will was proved on 23 Feb 1863 in Christian Co., Kentucky, County Court.60 An inventory of his accounts and debts owed him was filed on 20 Apr 1863. It listed 13 notes and three certificates of deposit, totaling $44,899.80, due between Jan 1861 and Nov 1862.61 Settlements were filed by the executors on 25 Feb 1865 and 26 Aug 1867, showing that all the debts except four of smaller the notes totaling $2,700, were collected. With interest, over $55,000 was collected. After expenses, all the bequests were paid except to Virginia, who was not yet of age, with additional payments of $2,700 to each of them.62
     
Research Note, 18 Nov 2008:
It has been proposed that Dr. Davis Green Tuck was descended from Thomas Tuck, in part based on the assertion that Davis's plantation was in the section in which Thomas took up land in the 1750's, and was bisected by Cowford Rd., which was opened by Thomas in 1756. But the land Davis held there was a gift from his wife's father, not inherited from his own family. Thomas had three sons, Thomas, John and William, so if Davis was his grandson, no evidence has been found to establish which of them might have been Davis' father.63,64


Research Note, 25 Feb 2009:
Alethea Jane Macon in her Tuck genealogy reports that the descendants of Dr. Davis Green Tuck have believed that the name of his wife was Elizabeth Mishen. Record of his marriage to Elizabeth M. Toot has been found, but no marriage record has been found for another marriage. Davis' will refers to his wife as E. M. Tuck, and her tombstone reads the same. His daughter Rebecca supposedly named a son Mishen, so it seems quite possible Mishen was Elizabeth's middle name. Scant records have been found for anyone surnamed Mishen during that time in either Virginia or Pennsylvania, which is supposedly where the Toots arrived from, so the origin of that name are unclear.65,66,67

Children:
     Children with Elizabeth M. Toot

Their eldest son, William, was apparently adopted. He was born three years before their marriage, and used the surname Edmondson until after he graduated from medical school. His birth parents were probably one of the Edmondson families living in the area, but their identity is unknown.

Citations

  1. [S2061] Macon, John and Edward Tuck of Halifax County, pg 28, shows name as David Green Tuck.
  2. [S4460] David G. Tuck and Elizabeth Toot, marriage bond and permission slip.
  3. [S636] Davis G. Tuck household, 1820 U.S. Census, Halifax Co., Virginia.
  4. [S631] Dr. Davis G. Tuck household, 1850 U.S. Census, Christian Co., Kentucky, shows her in his household.
  5. [S2144] Meador and Meador, Cemetery Records of Southern Christian County, pg 134, shows her buried in his family cemetery.
  6. [S2144] Meador and Meador, Cemetery Records of Southern Christian County, pg 134, shows date.
  7. [S2061] Macon, John and Edward Tuck of Halifax County, pg 28, shows year as c., county and state, citing U.S. Census records.
  8. [S631] Dr. Davis G. Tuck household, 1850 U.S. Census, Christian Co., Kentucky, shows age 56 and state.
  9. [S4460] David G. Tuck and Elizabeth Toot, marriage bond and permission slip, shows date of bond and permission slip, as 11th, and county.
  10. [S631] Dr. Davis G. Tuck household, 1850 U.S. Census, Christian Co., Kentucky, shows them in same household, apparently as husband and wife.
  11. [S2111] McNeil et al v. Mills and Young, transcript of proceedings of Circuit Court of Shelby Co., 12 Aug 1885, pg 210, shows month and year.
  12. [S2014] Christian Co. Wills S:105-6, will dated 25 Mar 1861, proved Feb 1863.
  13. [S2144] Meador and Meador, Cemetery Records of Southern Christian County, pg 134.
  14. [S2724] "University of Pennsylvania Medical Department Matriculants", pg 20, surnames beginning with "T," shows him in 1813 and in 1817, with no mark showing he received an M. D. degree.
  15. [S2725] Miller, "RE: Medical Department Matriculants, 1806-1852 - Tuck, Davis & William," e-mail to author, 15 Jun 2010, shows he was enrolled 1812/1813 and 1816/1817 sessions and found on pg 48 of a ledger.
  16. [S2718] Journal of Executive Proceedings of the Senate, vol 2, pp 587-8, 1 Dec 1814, nominations received by Senate; pg 591, 10 Dec 1814, consented to surgeon's mate nominations.
  17. [S2202] American State Papers, Naval Affairs, vol 1, pp 365-8, 7 Dec 1815 report of B. W. Crowninshield, Secretary of the Navy, to U.S. Senate, part 6, Register of Commissioned and warrant officers of the United States Navy..., shows Davis as surgeons' mate, commissioned 10 Dec 1814.
  18. [S2061] Macon, John and Edward Tuck of Halifax County, pg 29, mentions his medical practice as well as his farming.
  19. [S636] Davis G. Tuck household, 1820 U.S. Census, Halifax Co., Virginia, shows one person engaged in agriculture, and six slaves, all male.
  20. [S633] Davis G. Tuck household, 1840 U.S. Census, Christian Co., Kentucky, shows 24 people engaged in agriculture, and 36 slaves.
  21. [S631] Dr. Davis G. Tuck household, 1850 U.S. Census, Christian Co., Kentucky, shows occupation as farmer.
  22. [S659] Doct. Davis G. Tuck, owner, 1850 U.S. Census, Christian Co., Kentucky, slave schedule.
  23. [S632] D. G. Tuck household, 1860 U.S. Census, Christian Co., Kentucky, shows occupation as farmer.
  24. [S2722] Olmstead and Rhode, Creating Abundance, pg 210, describes his role in developing flue curing.
  25. [S2723] Jones, Journal of the Franklin Institute, pg 11, provides summary of patent.
  26. [S2720] United States Congressional Serial Set, House Doc. No. 49, 21st Congress, 2nd session, Letter from the Secretary of State, Transmitting a list of Patents Granted for Useful Inventions during the year 1830, 13 Jan 1831, pg 8.
  27. [S2720] United States Congressional Serial Set, House Doc. No. 39, 22nd Congress, 1st session, Letter from the Secretary of State, Transmitting a list of Patents Granted for Useful Inventions during the year 1831, 5 Jan 1831, pg 4.
  28. [S2723] Jones, Journal of the Franklin Institute, pg 374, provides summary of patent; pp 384-6, provides copy of Davis' description of system and sketch.
  29. [S2722] Olmstead and Rhode, Creating Abundance, pg 210, describes his role in developing flue curing and it's continued use.
  30. [S4479] Virginia: A Synopsis of the Geology, Geography, Climate and Soil, pg 46.
  31. [S2722] Olmstead and Rhode, Creating Abundance, pg 210, describes his role in developing flue curing and its continued use.
  32. [S6585] "Flue Curing Discovered," Richmond Times-Dispatch, 24 Jul 1938.
  33. [S4482] "I'm Thinking," Sunday Telegram, 1 Feb 1953.
  34. [S4477] Will Books, Halifax Co., Virginia, 12:104, Coleman Tuck Will, 26 Mar 1821.
  35. [S4575] Halifax Co. Deeds, Halifax Co., Virginia, 34:90-2, 8 Aug 1826.
  36. [S4662] Land Tax Books, Halifax Co., Virginia, 1823 B, pp 80-1, shows Adam had obtained the land from Craddock since the prior year's tax list.
  37. [S4662] Land Tax Books, Halifax Co., Virginia, 1823 B, pg 80; 1824 B pg 84; 1825 B, pg 94; 1826 B, pg 94; and 1827 B, pp 98-9.
  38. [S1038] Owen Family Bible, lists Sarah, b. 1818, Rebecca, b. 1824, and Walter, b. 1824, among the grandchildren of Adam and Sarah Toot born as late as 1834, but does not include William J.
  39. [S636] Davis G. Tuck household, 1820 U.S. Census, Halifax Co., Virginia, shows no males under age 10.
  40. [S635] Davis G. Tuck household, 1830 U.S. Census, Halifax Co., Virginia, shows two white males age 15 to 20 in the household.
  41. [S2111] McNeil et al v. Mills and Young, transcript of proceedings of Circuit Court of Shelby Co., 12 Aug 1885, pg 442, testimony, of Richard Tuck, shows he responded yes to the question "Did you have a brother who was a physician in Memphis.
  42. [S4401] Pictorial Life of Benjamin Franklin, includes inscription "Christmas Present to Walter S. Tuck from his affectionate brother Wm. J. Tuck, Dec 17th 1846."
  43. [S4575] Halifax Co. Deeds, Halifax Co., Virginia, 35:323-5, 30 Jan 1828.
  44. [S4483] Act Passed at the General Assembly of Virginia 1832, pg 307.
  45. [S4575] Halifax Co. Deeds, Halifax Co., Virginia, 35:385-6, 11 Mar 1828.
  46. [S4575] Halifax Co. Deeds, Halifax Co., Virginia, 37:497-9, 25 Jan 1830.
  47. [S4575] Halifax Co. Deeds, Halifax Co., Virginia, 37:657-8, 28 Jan 1830.
  48. [S4576] Royall Daniel and Frances M. Daniel households, 1830 U.S. Census, Halifax Co., Virginia.
  49. [S4575] Halifax Co. Deeds, Halifax Co., Virginia, 39:73-5, 10 Aug 1831.
  50. [S635] Davis G. Tuck household, 1830 U.S. Census, Halifax Co., Virginia.
  51. [S4575] Halifax Co. Deeds, Halifax Co., Virginia, 38:136-8, 13 Nov 1830.
  52. [S4575] Halifax Co. Deeds, Halifax Co., Virginia, 39:464-5, 13 Mar 1832.
  53. [S4662] Land Tax Books, Halifax Co., Virginia, 1832 B, pp 70-1.
  54. [S4575] Halifax Co. Deeds, Halifax Co., Virginia, 39:464-5, 13 Mar 1832, shows that both appeared before justices in Halifax Co. on 13 Mar 1832 to certify the deed.
  55. [S4483] Act Passed at the General Assembly of Virginia 1832, pg 307, act passed 12 Dec 1833, regarding John S. Lewellen who had replaced Davis G. Tuck as trustee "he having removed from this state."
  56. [S633] Davis G. Tuck household, 1840 U.S. Census, Christian Co., Kentucky.
  57. [S631] Dr. Davis G. Tuck household, 1850 U.S. Census, Christian Co., Kentucky.
  58. [S632] D. G. Tuck household, 1860 U.S. Census, Christian Co., Kentucky.
  59. [S644] D. G. Tuck, owner, 1860 U.S. Census, Christian Co., Kentucky, slave schedule.
  60. [S2014] Christian Co. Wills S:105-6.
  61. [S2016] Christian Co. Wills T:88-9 and T:688-9, settlements filed 25 Feb 1865 and 26 Aug 1867.
  62. [S2016] Christian Co. Wills T:88-9 and T:688-9, settlements filed 25 Feb 1865 26 Aug 1867.
  63. [S2061] Macon, John and Edward Tuck of Halifax County, pg 28, states that Davis' parents are not known, but he is believed by some to be descended from Thomas Tuck who died in 1788. Notes that Davis' plantation was in the section in with Thomas took up land in the 1750's, and was bisected the the Cowford Road which Thomas opened in 1756.
  64. [S4575] Halifax Co. Deeds, Halifax Co., Virginia, 34:90-2, 8 Aug 1826, Adam Toot and wife Sarah, 280 acres to Davis G. Tuck and wife Elizabeth for "love and affection"; 38:136-8, 13 Nov 1830, , same parcel to Daniel L. Dunscomb.
  65. [S2061] Macon, John and Edward Tuck of Halifax County, pg 28.
  66. [S731] Halifax Co. Marriage Bond Register, bk. 1, pg 98, 11 Mar 1818, Davis G. Tuck and Elizabeth Toot.
  67. [S2144] Meador and Meador, Cemetery Records of Southern Christian County, pg 134, shows name as Mrs. E. M. Tuck.
  68. [S2135] Walker, Robards and Shanks, "Death of Prof. W. J. Tuck," pg 190.
  69. [S2132] Bruesch, "Early Medical History of Memphis," pg 57, citing W. J. Tuck, "An Essay on Yellow Fever," New Orleans Medical and Surgical Journal, II, 175-191, 1846.
  70. [S2061] Macon, John and Edward Tuck of Halifax County, pg 29.
  71. [S2014] Christian Co. Wills S:105-6, shows her as his daughter.
  72. [S1038] Owen Family Bible, lists her among the other grandchildren of Adam and Sarah Toot.
  73. [S393] Sarah E. Atkinson household, 1880 U.S. Census, Shelby Co., Tennessee, shows Mattie as sister of Sarah.
  74. [S2014] Christian Co. Wills S:105-6, mentions his McNeill grandchildren.
  75. [S1038] Owen Family Bible, lists him among the other grandchildren of Adam and Sarah Toot.
  76. [S631] Dr. Davis G. Tuck household, 1850 U.S. Census, Christian Co., Kentucky, shows them in the same household, appearing to be parent and child.
  77. [S2014] Christian Co. Wills S:105-6, shows the boy as his son.
  78. [S1285] Wills, Shelby Co., Tennessee, 8:289-92, Sarah E. Atkinson, 1882, shows Henry as her brother.
  79. [S1351] Atkinson, Shelby Co. Tennessee loose probate records, Petition filed 20 Oct 1883 by Malcom McNeill, et at, shows Bettie as Sarah's sister.
  80. [S1285] Wills, Shelby Co., Tennessee, 8:289-92, Sarah E. Atkinson, 1882, shows Richard as her brother.
  81. [S1285] Wills, Shelby Co., Tennessee, 8:289-92, Sarah E. Atkinson, 1882, shows A. P. as her brother.
  82. [S1215] Martha W. Bacon, Certificate of Death, shows her father as Dr. Tuck.
  83. [S4415] Jennie Tuck Cobb grave marker, Greenwood Cemetery.