Jane Clendenin1,2,3

ID# 13683, (1758 - abt 1824)
FatherArchibald Clendenin Jr.2,3,4 (abt 1730 - 15 Jul 1763)
MotherAnn [surname unknown]2,3,4 (30 Nov 1738 - abt 1817)

Key Events:

Birth: Jan 1758 or Feb 17585,6,7,8
Marriage: John Davis, 1774, probably in Botetourt Co., Virginia9,10,11
Death: about Aug 1824, Christian Co., Kentucky12,13

Spouse:John Davis (about 1754 - 1800)
     Children:

  • Nancy Davis35,36 (abt 1775 - )
  • Elizabeth Davis37 (May 1783 - )
  • Jane Davis38 (15 Jun 1785 - a 1840)
  • Rebeccah Davis39,2 (abt 1786 - bt 1828 - Jun 1830)
  • Mary Gray Davis2,40,41 (abt 1787 - )
  • Sarah Davis42 (abt 1788 - 1853)

Copyright Notice

Narrative:

     Jane Clendenin was born in Jan 1758 or Feb 1758.5,6,7,8

Captured by Indians --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Exactly what happened at the Clendenin farm on 15 Jul 1763 is lost to history, but the various accounts agree on the major points. The Shawnee chief Cornstalk, and a band of perhaps sixty tribesmen, had attacked the settlers at Muddy Creek. The next day twenty or so proceeded to the Clendenin farm. They initially posed as friendly, asking for something to eat, and were offered some of the elk that Archibald, a noted hunter, had just brought home. Indians had visited with the Whites before, so this was not suspicious. Some accounts suggest as many as 100 settlers joined in the feast, but the more reliable sources suggest that only the Clendenins, Ann's half-brother John Ewing, and two slaves were there. At some point the Indians attacked, killing and scalping Archibald, and by some accounts also killing their infant son in the process, though this seems doubtful. While some accounts report others killed, none have actually been named. Two slaves working in the field escaped without being noticed. The buildings were burned, and the Ann and the children, including young John Ewing, were taken captive and marched off to join the captives from Muddy Creek.14,15,16
     Jane, her two young brothers, and their mother were left in charge of an old Indian with the other women and children, while the rest of the band left for several days, taking her uncle John Ewing with them. When the party of Indians returned with more captives the group started their march northward, toward Ohio. While her infant son in the care of another woman, Ann found opportunity to escape. By some accounts she slipped off the trail down a steep precipice, hiding under a large rock as the group moved forward. Another says a packhorse fell as they crossed Sewell Mountain, and she escaped in the confusion. When the Indians realized that she was missing, they made her infant child cry in an unsuccessful attempt to lure her back. Most accounts agree child was then killed, some offering gruesome versions of the story.17,18
     Jane and her uncle, John Ewing, continued with the other captives on a journey of 175 miles over the mountains to the Indian towns in Ohio. Once there she was "adopted" by an Indian family and lived with them for several years.19 She stayed with the family in Delaware Town, seeing her uncle only occasionally.20 After a treaty was signed with the Indians Jane Clendenin and her uncle John Ewing were released on 10 May 1765 in Fort Pitt. While other accounts have John released long before the other captives, and Jane not released until 1770, records from Ft. Pitt prove both were released together. Several accounts agree that when Jane was returned to her mother, the mother at first said it was not her daughter. But after finding a mark on the girl's heel, she was convinced that it was indeed her child.21,22,23,24,25,26,27

Returned to Normal --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Stories told years later say she, "being a great heiress, rang loud in her day," had many suitors came to woo her, all being rejected until she married Davis.28 She married John Davis in 1774, probably in Botetourt Co., Virginia.9,10,11
     Jane Clendenin was named an heir in the will of her husband, John Davis, dated 17 Mar 1800 in Greenbrier Co., Virginia, in which he left her 150 ac. including his dwelling and improvements, for her natural life. She was also left all the household furniture and livestock, and two slaves. Three other slaves were to work on the plantation for the benefit of her and their unmarried childern until the youngest became of age or married, and the be sold. Daughter Polly would receive half the land when she arrived at full age or married. He also charged her to "watch over the tender years of my dear children to warn them of the vices and dangers of the world, and carefully to instruct them in the Paths of Virtue and Rectitude which finally lead to enjoyments that will end no more." Jane was to serve as executrix, along with Wm Rennick, John Stuart, and Joseph Maze.29
     Her husband died in 1800 in Greenbrier Co., Virginia.30,31,32
     Jane bought 122¾ acres for $1 in Greenbrier Co., Virginia, from Linah Mims and Rebeccah Davis, her daughter, on 25 Mar 1811. The property adjoined that of Archibald Rodgers, Lewis's old place, widow Henderick, Williams Handley, Jane Davis, and Andrew Matter, and was part of a survey granted to John Davis, dec'd., for 363 ac. It would appear to be the property Rebeccah had inherited from father in Apr 1800.1

A Fascinating Will --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Jane left a will dated 10 Jul 1824, naming her son-in-law, Thomas Arbuckle, as executor. He was to receive one negro boy named Jonathan, and sell all the other slaves on a credit of 12 months. From the proceeds, four daughters were to each receive $100, and three grandchildren $50 each. The executor was to "purchase a likey negro girl of eight or ten years of age the price not to exceed three hundred and fifty dollars" and that slave to go to grandson Davis Russer Mims, except his mother shall have "the use and benefit of said negro during her natural life." Grandchildren Addison, Julia, Cornelia and Rufus Mims were each to receive one child of this slave, with any others to Davis. Granddaughter Jane Clendenin Long was to receive the land where her grandmother lives along with furniture and household effects, a feather bed, and $400 if that much remains after other bequests. Granddaughter Ann Eliza Long was to receive a cow and calf. Any money still remaining was to go to daughters "Nancy, Sally, Betsy, Jane and Polly."33
     Jane died about Aug 1824 in Christian Co., Kentucky.12,13
     Her will was probated Sep Term 1824 in Christian Co., Kentucky.33
     An appraisement of her estate was filed in the Dec 1824 term of the Christian Co. Court. It valued her property at a total of $1,210, as follows:
1 cupboard $5.00   1 cow & calf $12.00
1 Bed 20.00   1 Negro girl 35.00
2 chairs 2.50   part of a bond on John Greensaid and William David 39.18
2 Miegletus [?] 0.75   a claim on Davis Breeding 20.00
2 blankets 9.00   1 sheep 2.00
1 quilt & counterpane 20.00   interest in a sorrel horse 10.86
1 bay mare 50.00   Ailly [?] a Negro woman & child 500.00
1 gray filly 25.00   Letty [?] Negro girl 250.00
1 wheel and card 2.50   Franie [?] Negro girl 200.00
kitchen furniture 6.00

     An "additional appraisement" was, curiously, filed the month before, in the Nov 1824 term, listing one old brown man valued at $10.00.34

Citations

  1. [S1959] Greenbrier Co. Deeds , 4:451, Linah Mims and Rebekah his wife to Jane Davis, Jul 1811.
  2. [S402] Marlow, "Linah Mims," e-mail to author, 20 Oct 2001.
  3. [S661] Moses, "The Clendenin Massacre", citing Ruth Woods Dayton, Greenbrier Pioneers and Their Homes (Charleston, West Virginia: West Virginia Publishing Company, 1942) pp. 225-235.
  4. [S745] Norman, "Descendants Of Adam Clendenin."
  5. [S402] Marlow, "Linah Mims," e-mail to author, 20 Oct 2001, shows c. 1760.
  6. [S655] Chalkley, Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish, vol II pg 93, citing Circuit Court Judgments and Causes Ended (O. S. 56; N. S. 19), shows John Ewing deposed she was born January or February, 1758.
  7. [S661] Moses, "The Clendenin Massacre", citing Ruth Woods Dayton, Greenbrier Pioneers and Their Homes (Charleston, West Virginia: West Virginia Publishing Company, 1942) pp. 225-235, shows Jane the eldest child of Archibald and Anne, about age 4, but not clear if at the time of the massacre or when moving to Greenbrier.
  8. [S745] Norman, "Descendants Of Adam Clendenin", shows c. 1754.
  9. [S655] Chalkley, Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish, vol II pg 93, citing Circuit Court Judgments and Causes Ended (O. S. 56; N. S. 19), shows "they were married before 25th March, 1775" and that John Rodges said they married in 1774.
  10. [S402] Marlow, "Linah Mims," e-mail to author, 20 Oct 2001, shows year, as c., 1772 and probably Greenbriar Co. West Virginia, but Greenbrier did not exist until 1778, and the Greenbriar area was then in Botetourt Co.
  11. [S7378] Will Books, Greenbrier Co., West Virginia, 1:136-8, will of John Davis, shows his wife as Jean.
  12. [S2021] Christian Co. Wills D:181-3, dated 10 Jul 1824 and probated in the September term.
  13. [S402] Marlow, "Linah Mims," e-mail to author, 20 Oct 2001, shows county and state.
  14. [S655] Chalkley, Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish, vol II pg 93, citing Circuit Court Judgments and Causes Ended (O. S. 56; N. S. 19), shows John Ewing was deposed in c. 1804 he was captured 15th July, 1763.
  15. [S657] Matthews, "Captive of The Shawnee", shows date as June 1763, describes 17 (another place 19) Indians seemingly friendly arrival, then killing and scalping Archibald and setting fire to the cabin, and taking Ann, John, and the children off. There is no mention of any settlers other than the family and two slaves. In describing Ann's return to the homestead, mentions she buried her husband's body, with no reference to a child's body there.
  16. [S685] Royall, Sketches of History, Life, and Manners, pg 61-62, describes the Shawanese killing Yokum and others at Muddy Creek, then coming to the Clendenings; asking for food, Ann getting meat from the kettle, scalping of Archibald, plundering and burning the house, and the capture of Ann, her three children, and John Ewing. There is no mention of any other settlers.
  17. [S657] Matthews, "Captive of The Shawnee", shows Nancy [Ann], her children, and John were marched toward the Ohio River, and she escaped when a pack horse fell while crossing Sewell Mountian; of holding the child by the legs to make it cry and then killing it.
  18. [S685] Royall, Sketches of History, Life, and Manners, pg 62-64, describes the march to join the other captives, Ann's attempt to convince the other women to escape and being overheard by the guard while John and the rest of the Indians were gone, starting northward, Ann's jumping off the trial and hiding, making the child cry, and that they killed it and went on.
  19. [S657] Matthews, "Captive of The Shawnee", recounts journey to Picawillma, near present day Circleville, after reclaiming canoes hidden at the mouth of the Kanawha, and stopping at the salt licks near present Jackson. Also shows John's adoption by mother of White Otter, the Indian who captured him.
  20. [S660] Gallipolis Journal, 21 Apr 1870.
  21. [S655] Chalkley, Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish, vol II pg 93, citing Circuit Court Judgments and Causes Ended (O. S. 56; N. S. 19), shows John Ewing was deposed he and Jane were released together in Pittsburg on 14th May, 1765.
  22. [S656] Price, Historical Sketches of Pocahontas County, pg 612, shows John was released after a treaty with the Indians, probably in 1764, and was delivered to Fort Pitt.
  23. [S657] Matthews, "Captive of The Shawnee", shows John was freed by a treaty between the British and the Shawnee and walked through the wilderness to Fort Pitt, the nearest white settlement.
  24. [S660] Gallipolis Journal, 21 Apr 1870, shows John was releases as a result of one of the many treaties, and reaching Pittsburg.
  25. [S684] List of prisoners delivered by the Shawanese at Fort Pitt, Thomas Gage Papers, 10 May 1765, William L. Clements Library, shows both John Ewing and Jean Clandinnon released 10 May 1765 at Ft. Pitt.
  26. [S685] Royall, Sketches of History, Life, and Manners, pg 65, shows John returned "by some means, before the general ransom of the prisoners," pg 66, shows Jane was held for seven years, and when she returned her mother failed to recognize her, until finding a mark on the girl's body she recalled.
  27. [S745] Norman, "Descendants Of Adam Clendenin", shows she was released at Pittsburgh 14 May 1765.
  28. [S685] Royall, Sketches of History, Life, and Manners, pg 66.
  29. [S7378] Will Books, Greenbrier Co., West Virginia, 1:136-8, will of John Davis.
  30. [S1963] Marlow, "Will of John Davis", shows his will was dated 17 Mar 1800 and probated April 1800.
  31. [S402] Marlow, "Linah Mims," e-mail to author, 20 Oct 2001, shows year, county, and state, as West Virginia.
  32. [S655] Chalkley, Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish, vol II pg 93, citing Circuit Court Judgments and Causes Ended (O. S. 56; N. S. 19), shows year.
  33. [S2021] Christian Co. Wills D:181-3.
  34. [S2022] Davis, appraisal, 1824, Recorder.
  35. [S898] Greenbrier Co. loose papers, marriage permission, Nancy Davis, 7 Apr 1790.
  36. [S2021] Christian Co. Wills D:181-3, names a daughter Nancy Fair as heir.
  37. [S2021] Christian Co. Wills D:181-3, names a daughter Betsy Long as heir.
  38. [S2021] Christian Co. Wills D:181-3, names a daughter Jane Arbuckle as heir.
  39. [S898] Greenbrier Co. loose papers, marriage permission, Jane Davis, 23 Feb 1803, shows Rebeccah as Jane's daughter.
  40. [S2021] Christian Co. Wills D:181-3, names a daughter Polly Smith as heir.
  41. [S685] Royall, Sketches of History, Life, and Manners, pg 66, shows Jane and Mr. Davies had a daugther who married Ballard Smith.
  42. [S2021] Christian Co. Wills D:181-3, names a daughter Sally Breeding as heir.