Carlos Cobb1,2,3

ID# 9451, (1815 - 1877)
FatherDr. John Cobb4,5 (25 Jul 1789 - 6 May 1832)
MotherSarah Robbins4,5 (1 Sep 1789 - 27 Jul 1844)

Key Events:

Birth: 28 Feb 1815, Athens, Vermont6,7,8
Marriage: Emeline Field, 18389,10,11
Death: 16 Sep 1877, Tarrytown, New York12,13,7
Burial: Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo, Erie Co., New York14,15

Spouse:Emeline Field (10 Mar 1815 - 25 Nov 1875)
     Children:

ChartsDescendants of Gideon Cobb
AncestryThe Cobbs of Pawlet, Vermont

Copyright Notice

Narrative:

     Carlos Cobb was born on 28 Feb 1815 in Athens, Vermont.6,7,8 He and his brother Oscar were baptized on 23 Aug 1818 in Ogden Presbyterian Church, Ogden, New York.16
     He was probably one of the two males under age 10 listed in the household of his father, Dr. John Cobb, in the 1820 Federal Census of Ogden, Genesee Co., New York.17 He was probably the male age 15 to 20 listed in the household of his father in the 1830 Federal Census of Ogden, Monroe Co., New York.18
     His father died on 6 May 1832, when Carlos was about 17 years old.19,20,21
     Carlos served in the Rochester militia. The 1838 rolls show him as paymaster in Col Horace Gay's 18th rifle regiment, 3rd brigade, 2nd division.22
     Carlos married Emeline Field, daughter of Joseph Field and Lydia Glover, in 1838.9,10,11
     The earliest record we have of Carlos's occupation is the 1840 census, in which he said he was engaged in two categories, "commerce" and "manufactures and trade." Exactly what he was doing is unclear. Shortly after that he was admitted to the bar in Rochester, where he practiced for several years.23,24,25
     Carlos appeared on the 1840 Federal Census of Rochester, Monroe Co., New York, with a household consisting of one male age 20 to 30 (himself), one female under age 5 (daughter Emeline), and one age 20 to 30 (wife Emeline.)26

Moving to Buffalo --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Carlos and Emeline moved to Buffalo before Jun 1843, when his name appears on a list of citizens organizing a committee to make arrangements for a visit of President John Tyler to the city.27,28
     Carlos had established his business as produce commission merchant and shipping agent in Buffalo by Mar 1844, when he was running ads in the local newspaper.29
Ad for Carlos Cobb's business in Buffalo
from the Buffalo Commercial Advertiser 27 Mar 184429

     He became interested in geology about this time. He made a large collection of fossils, some of which he gave to Yale College and to the Metropolitan Museum. It was as a geologist that he and his brother Oscar were engaged by the Upper Canada Co. to explore the north shore of Lake Superior and locate mines in 1845-46.30,31
     Oscar joined him in the produce commission business in 1847, operating under the name of Cobb & Co. Taking advantage of the confluence there of lake shipping and the Erie Canal, they established their business at 23 Central Wharf in Buffalo. The wharf was the center of the grain trade in Buffalo at the time.32,33,34,35,36,37
     Carlos and Emeline appeared on the 1850 Federal Census of Buffalo, Erie Co., New York, enumerated 7 Aug 1850. Their children Emeline and Sarah were listed as living with them, as was Eva Kester, age 16, who appears to have been a servant.1 By 1852 they were living at 28 East Swan St..38
     Carlos and Emeline appeared on the 1855 State Census of Buffalo, Erie Co., New York, enumerated 8 Jun 1855, reporting that they lived in a brick house valued at $4,000. Their children Emeline and Sarah were listed as living with them, as was a 17-year old servant listed only as Mayaretta.2
     Carlos and Emeline appeared on the 1860 Federal Census of Buffalo, Erie Co., New York, enumerated 7 Jul 1860, reporting no real estate but personal estate of $12,000. Their children Emeline and Sarah were listed as living with them, as was Lana Runkle, age 19, a servant.39

Joining in Civic Affairs --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Carlos took an active part in the Young Men's Association of the City of Buffalo from 1850, when he first appeared as a member, until about 1857. By 1852 he was one of eight managers and a member of several standing committees, roles which continued through 1855. In 1853 he was acknowledged for having contributed "various valuable specimens" and for creating "the very perfect catalogue of the geological and mineralogical specimens, as well as the fossils belonging to the Association." In 1857 he was first vice president, but is not mentioned after that.40
     The Association was formed about 1835 and operated a library for members. In 1887 it gave its collections and its new building to the city to from the Buffalo Public Library.41
     Erie Co. supporters of John C. Breckenridge, U.S. Presidential candidate of the southern faction of the Democratic National Convention, met in Buffalo 13 Oct 1860. They nominated Carlos as candidate for U.S. Congress when they had concerns about the connections of former Congressman Solomon G. Haven, the candidate initially proposed. By the end of the month he had satisfied their concerns and Carlos declined the nomination.42,43

Becoming a Leader in Industry Matters --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Carlos was also active in industry affairs. In the late 1850's the railroads were threatening the canals as a means to transport produce, and applying rates and policies seen as unfair to agricultural interest in the state. Several conventions were held in 1859 with unwieldy titles like “The New York State Conventions for ‘Rescuing the Canals from the Ruin with which they are Threatened’: By Exposing and Resisting ‘The Railroad Conspiracy’ for ‘Discrediting the Canals, and Diminishing their Revenues, with a view of Bringing them under the Hammer’ and Adopting Measures for Counteracting ‘The Ruinous Competition with Railroads, Permitted by the State, and Instituted by Railroad Directors for the Express Purpose of Breaking Down the Credit of the Canals’ .” Carlos was chairman of the state executive committee which sponsored them and an active participant.
     The rates charged by the railroads for transportation of goods were a major issue. Their rates for shipping within New York were only slightly lower, or actually higher, than rates charged for shipping longer distances from outside the state. For example, the rate for pork was $1 per barrel from Chicago to New York, and 75¢ from Buffalo to New York; household goods were 60¢ per 100 lb. from New York to Cleveland and 70¢ from Troy to Buffalo. The organization supported legislation known as the "pro-rata bill" in 1859-60 to address these issue, but it was defeated in the legislature.44,45

Moving to New York City --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Carlos and Emeline moved to New York City in 1862.46,47
     They appeared on the 1870 Federal Census of New York, New York Co., New York, enumerated Jul 1870, in what appears to have been a hotel or boarding house operated by Mary L. Underhill. Their daughter Emeline was listed as living with them. There are 15 others with surname Underhill listed in the dwelling, apparently children, grandchildren or other relatives of Mrs. Underhill. There were 24 others who appear to have been resident guests, including several couples and small families. They would seem to have been well cared for by the 15 domestic servants who are also listed.48

Continued Leadership in the Industry --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     In New York Carlos became a member of the produce exchange, becoming its first chairman of the committee on grain. He was responsible for a number of reforms in the exchange.49
     Carlos continued to be active in transportation matters after he moved to New York City. For example, in Mar 1869 he was a member of a group who obtained approval of their fellow members of the Produce Exchange to recommend to the state legislature changes in the management of the state's canals and authorize issuance of bonds to finance improvements.50
     On 16 Oct 1873 Carlos testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Transportation about the state of grain storage facilities in New York and the charges for storage and for transferring shipments to and from storage.51

A Business Transaction Gone Bad --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     A transaction that went awry and ended up before the New York Court of Appeals, the state's highest court, provides insight into the workings of the grain exchange. On 23 Oct 1868 Carlos sold a small lot of wheat to another broker at the exchange, Samuel P. Knapp. At the time a sample of grain being offered was presented in a small box. Carlos was trying to sell the remainder of a load of Milwaukee wheat from the boat "McKibbe." He was anxious to sell it as the boat was "lying on demurrage," that is incurring charges for failure to unload in the allowed time. After several conversations they finally agreed on a price, 66½¢ per bushel. The lot was to go to the Blissville Distillery on Newton Creek, which was out of the normal zone, so the buyer agreed to pay for the extra towing.52
     When weighed at delivery the load was found to amount to 3,023 16/60 bushels (a bushel in the grain trade, then as now, is a measure of weight, in the case of wheat it is 60 pounds). The sale totaled $5,039, plus $11 charge for weighing and $15 for the extra towing, for a total of $5,064. After the wheat was delivered and weighed Carlos sent Knapp a bill. When payment was not forthcoming they had discussions and Knapp said he was having difficulty collecting from his customer, C. A. Steen & Co. When it was learned that firm had failed Carlos agreed to sue them for the amount due.53
     On 5 Nov 1868 Carlos filed for an attachment against the property of Christian A. Steen and others before the Supreme Court in New York City. The court issued an order of attachment the same day, noting that the defendants had "disposed of, removed and secreted their property with intent to defraud their creditors." On 21 Nov Carlos filed suit against Steen and the others for $5,604, interest, and the costs of the suit.54 That suit was discontinued without the claim being satisfied. But on 28 Oct 1969 Carlos did collect $1,688 and interest of $765 from the firm "inferentially." Details are not known.55
     On 28 Oct 1874 Carlos sued Knapp to recover the balance due him, $3,376, interest on that amount since the date of sale amounting to $1,889, and the costs of the suit. Under the law Knapp's liability depended whether he identified his customer to Carlos at the time of sale, in which case he was acting only as a broker, or if he did not and thus was acting as the buyer. He testified that he identified his customer initially, while Carlos testified that he did not. The jury believed Carlos and the court issued a judgment in his favor 21 Apr 1876.56 Knapp appealed the jury decision to the General Term of the Superior Court, which on 2 Jan 1877 affirmed the jury award and awarded costs of $106 to Carlos.57
     Knapp then appealed to the Court of Appeals, which on 8 Jan 1877 affirmed the decision of the lower court, assessing costs of $145. Carlos died before payment was received and his daughter Emeline, as his executrix, replaced him. Knapp did then pay her $6,498, the amount he owed under all the judgements.58

His Death Shortly After His Wife's --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     His wife died on 25 Nov 1875 at their home in New York City.59,60,61
     Carlos left a will dated 6 Sep 1876 stating he was of New York City, in which he left all his real estate, and all his personal estate remaining after payment of his debts and funeral expenses, to his daughter Emeline. He also named her as his executrix.62
     Carlos died on 16 Sep 1877 in Tarrytown, New York, at age 62, at his summer residence.12,13,7 He was buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo, Erie Co., New York, in his own lot, next to his wife.14,15
     His will was proved on 22 Sep 1877 in Surrogate's Court, New York Co., New York, by the testimony of the three witnesses, and his daughter Emeline was approved as executrix.62

Citations

  1. [S7715] Carlos Cobb household, 1850 U.S. Census, Erie Co., New York.
  2. [S7716] Carlos Cobb household, 1855 New York State Census, Erie Co., New York, Buffalo, ward 2.
  3. [S500] Findagrave.com, online, memorial # 74997064, Carlos Cobb, includes tombstone photo showing same.
  4. [S863] Cobb, History of the Cobb Family, pg 185.
  5. [S2607] Cleveland and Cleveland, Genealogy of the Cleveland and Cleaveland Families, vol 1 pg 46.
  6. [S863] Cobb, History of the Cobb Family, pg 185, shows date, town, and state.
  7. [S500] Findagrave.com, online, memorial # 74997064, Carlos Cobb, shows date and includes tombstone photo showing same.
  8. [S7716] Carlos Cobb household, 1855 New York State Census, Erie Co., New York, Buffalo, ward 2, shows age 38 and state.
  9. [S2607] Cleveland and Cleveland, Genealogy of the Cleveland and Cleaveland Families, vol 1 pg 46, shows year.
  10. [S7716] Carlos Cobb household, 1855 New York State Census, Erie Co., New York, Buffalo, ward 2, shows married.
  11. [S500] Findagrave.com, online, memorial # 75027430, Emeline Field Cobb, includes tombstone photo showing her as his wife.
  12. [S7779] Carlos Cobb obituary, New York Tribune, shows Sunday, summer residence, and city.
  13. [S7718] Forest Lawn Cemetery, death registers, bk C, tab C, pg 2, Carlos Cobb, shows date, and city.
  14. [S7723] Forest Lawn Cemetery, lot registers, sec. 3, lot N.E.Pt., Carlos Cobb.
  15. [S500] Findagrave.com, online, memorial # 74997064, Carlos Cobb, includes tombstone photo.
  16. [S7683] , "Ogden Presbyterian Church."
  17. [S2450] John Cobb household, 1820 U.S. Census, Genesee Co., New York.
  18. [S2451] John Cobb household, 1830 U.S. Census, Monroe Co., New York.
  19. [S7683] , "Marriages and Deaths from Rochester Newspapers, Jan. 1, 1832 - June 30, 1832," 16 May 1832 Rochester Daily Advertiser, 22 May issue of Anti-Masonic Enquirer and Rochester Republican all show date, as 9th, and "after a few days illness." Rochester Observer 16 May issue shows 3rd (may be a transcription error) and May 23 issue shows date as 8th. "Pioneer Cemetery," copied from July 1934 tombstone reading by the Irondequoit Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, shows date as 8th.
  20. [S863] Cobb, History of the Cobb Family, pg 185, shows date, as 6th ,town, and state.
  21. [S2607] Cleveland and Cleveland, Genealogy of the Cleveland and Cleaveland Families, vol 1 pg 45, shows year, town, county, state, and cause of death as "from infected poison of a patient."
  22. [S7774] O'Reilly, Settlement in the West: Sketches of Rochester, pg 327.
  23. [S7725] Wilson, Appletons' Cyclopedia of American Biography, I:666, shows he was admitted and practiced several years.
  24. [S7720] Carlos Cobb household, 1840 U.S. Census, Monroe Co., New York, shows one person engaged in commerce and one person engaged in manufactures and trade.
  25. [S2607] Cleveland and Cleveland, Genealogy of the Cleveland and Cleaveland Families, vol 1 pg 46, shows he was a lawyer in Rochester in 1843.
  26. [S7720] Carlos Cobb household, 1840 U.S. Census, Monroe Co., New York.
  27. [S7775] "Public Meeting," Buffalo Daily Gazette, 17 Jun 1843, shows him on list of citizens.
  28. [S7716] Carlos Cobb household, 1855 New York State Census, Erie Co., New York, Buffalo, ward 2, shows they had lived in this city 11 years.
  29. [S7776] "Business Directory," Buffalo Commercial Advertiser, 27 Mar 1844.
  30. [S2607] Cleveland and Cleveland, Genealogy of the Cleveland and Cleaveland Families, vol 1 pg 46, shows Carlos explored for Upper Canada Co. to locate mines in 1848, Oscar accompanied his brother to Lake Superior in 1847.
  31. [S7725] Wilson, Appletons' Cyclopedia of American Biography, I:666, shows his interest in geology and engaged by Canadian government as geologist to survey northern shore of Lake Superior in 1845-6.
  32. [S7755] The Commercial Advertiser Directory of Buffalo, 1852, pg 148, show Cobb & Co. commission merchants and address, both Carlos and Oscar as working for that firm.
  33. [S7725] Wilson, Appletons' Cyclopedia of American Biography, I:666, shows Carlos entered the produce commission business in 1847, and wrote tax bill.
  34. [S2607] Cleveland and Cleveland, Genealogy of the Cleveland and Cleaveland Families, vol 1 pg 46, shows Carlos was in business with his brother in 1848, and Oscar joined his brother in business as Cobb & Co. in 1847.
  35. [S7750] Hughes, American Ancestry, XI:64, shows Oscar was a grain and flour merchant in Buffalo.
  36. [S7715] Carlos Cobb household, 1850 U.S. Census, Erie Co., New York, shows occupation as commission merchant.
  37. [S2752] Joseph Guild household, 1850 U.S. Census, Erie Co., New York, shows Oscar's occupation as commercial merchant.
  38. [S7755] The Commercial Advertiser Directory of Buffalo, 1852, pg 148.
  39. [S7717] Carlos Cobb household, 1860 U.S. Census, Erie Co., New York.
  40. [S7724] Annual Report of the Young Men's Association of Buffalo, 1850, pg 36; 1852, pg 3; 1853, pg 18; 1855, pg 3; and 1858 pp 2,3.
  41. [S1265] Wikipedia, online, "Buffalo & Erie County Public Library," viewed Sep 2017.
  42. [S7771] "Movements of the People," The Press and Tribune, 17 Oct 1860, shows his nomination.
  43. [S7772] "Political," Alexandria Gazette, 30 Oct 1860, shows he declined nomination.
  44. [S7769] Clinton league for promoting the Completion of the Canal System, Proceedings of the New York State Conventions for Rescuing the Canals.
  45. [S7725] Wilson, Appletons' Cyclopedia of American Biography, I:666, shows he prepared a pro-rata tax bill in 1859-60 defeated in legislature.
  46. [S7725] Wilson, Appletons' Cyclopedia of American Biography, I:666, shows he moved in 1862.
  47. [S2607] Cleveland and Cleveland, Genealogy of the Cleveland and Cleaveland Families, vol 1 pg 46 shows he moved in 1862.
  48. [S7719] Mary L. Underhill household, 1870 U.S. Census, New York Co., New York.
  49. [S7725] Wilson, Appletons' Cyclopedia of American Biography, I:666.
  50. [S7770] "The Canal System," The Wheeling Daily Inteligencer, 24 Mar 1869.
  51. [S7773] "Cheap Transportation," The New York Herald, 17 Oct 1873.
  52. [S7765] Carlos Cobb v. Samuel P. Knapp, New York Court of Appeals, 1877, New York Court of Appeals, pp 33-4, Supreme Court testimony of Carlos Cobb; pp 9-10, testimony of Samuel Knapp.
  53. [S7765] Carlos Cobb v. Samuel P. Knapp, New York Court of Appeals, 1877, New York Court of Appeals, pg 49, copy of bill; pp 35-7, Supreme Court testimony of Carlos Cobb; pp 10, tesimony of Samuel Knapp.
  54. [S7765] Carlos Cobb v. Samuel P. Knapp, New York Court of Appeals, 1877, New York Court of Appeals, g 27, Supreme Court application for attachment; pp 29-30, order of attachment; and pp 31-2, complaint of Carlos Cobb.
  55. [S7765] Carlos Cobb v. Samuel P. Knapp, New York Court of Appeals, 1877, New York Court of Appeals, pg 5, defendant's answer to Superior Court; pg 556, Superior Court Opinion.
  56. [S7765] Carlos Cobb v. Samuel P. Knapp, New York Court of Appeals, 1877, New York Court of Appeals, pp 1-3, Summons to Superior Court; pg 5, defendants' answer; pp 43-4, charge to jury; pg 47, judgment.
  57. [S7765] Carlos Cobb v. Samuel P. Knapp, New York Court of Appeals, 1877, New York Court of Appeals, pg 51 Superior Court judgment.
  58. [S7766] Browne, Civil Procedure Reports: State of New York, VI:3.
  59. [S7777] Mrs. Carlos Cobb obituary, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, shows died Thursday last, at her home, and city.
  60. [S7718] Forest Lawn Cemetery, death registers, bk C, tab C, pg 1, Emeline F. Cobb, shows date and city.
  61. [S500] Findagrave.com, online, memorial # 75027430, Emeline Field Cobb, shows date and includes tombstone photo showing same.
  62. [S7721] Will book, New York Co., New York, 245:399-402, will of Carlos Cobb.
  63. [S7715] Carlos Cobb household, 1850 U.S. Census, Erie Co., New York, shows them apparently living as parent and child.
  64. [S7722] "Marriages and Deaths," New York Herald, 16 Dec 1864, shows her as his daughter.
  65. [S500] Findagrave.com, online, memorial # 75027531, Josephine Cobb, includes tombstone photo showing her as daughter of Carlos & Emeline Cobb.