Elijah George Galusha Jr.1,2,3

ID# 2626, (1780 - a 1854)
FatherCapt. Elijah George Galusha4,5 (23 Oct 1757 - 26 May 1783)
MotherBeulah Chittenden4,5 (15 May 1764 - 6 Feb 1824)

Key Events:

Birth: 17 Sep 1780, Arlington, Vermont6,7
Marriage: Lucy Willard Throop, 20 Feb 1803, Livingston Co., Kentucky8,9,10
Death: after 1854, Lyon Co., Kentucky11

Spouse: Lucy Willard Throop (11 Feb 1785 - )
     Children:

Based on the number of unidentified children in the 1810, 1820, 1830, and 1840 censuses, it appears that Elijah and Lucy had a number of additional children. Un-sourced online trees list Cynthia, born c. 1805 or c. 1818, Jonas born c. 1813, Beulah born c. 1815 or c. 1822, and Charity born c. 1829.
  • Henry S. Galusha39 (abt 1818 - )

Copyright Notice

Narrative:

     Elijah George Galusha Jr. was born on 17 Sep 1780 in Arlington, Vermont.6,7
     Elijah was part of a group of over seventy people who moved from Vermont to Kentucky under the leadership of Matthew Lyon, his mother's second husband. He was apparently part of a small group, including his cousin and her husband, Modena and Gideon Dyer Cobb, that made the trek in late 1799, followed by a larger group who arrived in Jun 1801.12,13,14 The group traveled in five wagons across the Allegheny Mountains to New Geneva, on the Monongahela River, over 50 miles above Pittsburgh, arriving in mid-Nov 1799. The water was too low to float down the river, so they spent the winter preparing their boats. New Geneva is not known to have been a common embarkation point, so it seems likely that the location was chosen because of Lyon's association with Albert Gallatin, minority leader of the House when Lyon was serving, and a resident there. Lyon left the party while preparations were underway, returning to his Congressional duties.15,16,17 It is clear that Elijah was in Kentucky before the main group arrived because on 5 May 1801 he was granted 400 acres in Livingston Co. by the county court.18 (For details, please see The Trek from Vermont to the Kentucky Wilderness.)

Establishing Himself in Eddyville --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Elijah took part in serving the community from an early date. On 5 May 1801 he and his cousin's husband, Gideon Dyer Cobb, were among five men charged by the Livingston Co. Court with appraising the estate of James Davenport. On 4 Dec the two were among five men appointed to review and mark a new road.19 At the Nov 1809 term of the Caldwell Co. Court he, along with Gideon Dyer Cobb, Samuel C. Clark and John Bradley, posted a bond to build a brick court house in Eddyville for Caldwell Co.20,21 (For more examples, see the extracted County Court Orders.)
     There is some evidence that Elijah may not have yet considered his initial move to Kentucky permanent. He was soon back in Vermont, selling a small parcel in Fair Haven for $23 on 18 Feb 1802, and that deed shows him as a resident of Williston, Chittenden Co., Vermont. There seems to have been some issue with the property, however, as he was back, or still, in Vermont on 8 Aug 1803 when the buyer deeded it back to him for the same price. The same day he sold it to another party for $8. By this time he was shown as a resident of Eddyville.22
     He also served in official capacities. On 1 Apr 1805 the County Court received his appointment as Justice of the Peace of Livingston Co. from Gov. Christopher Greenup. As a justice of the peace he became a member of the County Court, the governing body of the county, which also tried minor criminal cases, and adjudged probate matters. The next day he was also appointed by the County Court as a trustee of the town of Eddyville replacing Enoch Prince, who had resigned. In 1808 he was authorized to solemnize marriages, which was not automatically an authority which came with the office of justice of the peace.23
     When Caldwell Co. was formed effective 1 May 1809, Elijah was one of the eight justices of the peace appointed by the Governor, all taking their oaths at the first meeting of the County Court, which was held in Eddyville that day.24 Elijah was appointed to various duties in connection to maintaining roads, and as an election judge, by the Caldwell County Court in 1809 and 1810.25
     Elijah married Lucy Willard Throop, daughter of John Winchester Throop and Elizabeth [surname unknown], on 20 Feb 1803 in Livingston Co., Kentucky.8,9,10
     On 7 Aug 1810 he resigned his office as justice of the peace of Caldwell Co., but not without incident. On 3 Dec 1810 the County Court entered a judgment against him for failing to remit fines he had collected while in that office, and fined him $100 and costs. The matter was resolved the next day when he was permitted to make a return of fines of $5 each against Henry Bremer and Samuel Watson for breach of the peace on 7 Aug 1809, and one cent each against Samuel Mathew & Thomas Lucy for offences on 9 Aug 1809. The judgment and fine of the previous day was set aside.26 (For further details of his public service, see the extracted County Court Orders.)
     Elijah appeared on the 1810 Federal Census of Caldwell Co., Kentucky, with a household consisting of one male under age 10 (unknown), one age 10 to 16 (unknown), one age 16 to 26 (himself), three females under 10 (unknown), one age 16 to 26 (wife, Lucy Willard Throop.)27
     Elijah appeared on the 1820 Federal Census of Caldwell Co., Kentucky, with a household consisting of two white males under age 10 (son Henry and another, one age 26 to 45 (himself), two white females age 10 to 16 (unknown), one age 16 to 26 (unknown), and one age 26 to 45 (wife Lucy.)28
     Elijah appeared on the 1830 Federal Census of Caldwell Co., Kentucky, with a household consisting of one male age 10 to 15 (son Henry), one age 15 to 20 (unknown), and one age 30 to 40 (himself), one female age 15 to 20 (unknown), two age 20 to 30 (unknown), and one age 40 to 50 (wife Lucy.)29
     Elijah appeared on the 1840 Federal Census of Caldwell Co., Kentucky, with a household consisting of one white male aged 20 to 30 (son Henry), and one between 50 and 60 (himself); one female between 20 and 30 (unknown), and one between 40 and 50 (wife Lucy), and a female slave aged 10 to 24.30
     Elijah and Lucy appeared on the 1850 Federal Census of Caldwell Co., Kentucky, enumerated 30 Sep 1850, reporting real estate valued at $1,000. Their son Henry was listed as living with them, as were Charity Herrald, age 21, and George W. Parrent, age 8, a grandson.31

Merchant, Farmer, Teacher --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     He seems to have become involved in trading and mercantile activities soon after his arrival in Kentucky. On 21 May 1804 he was paid $1,703.53 for supplies for Meriwether Lewis and William Clark's expedition to explore the Pacific Northwest. The provisions he supplied were listed as:
1351 Comp Rats from 16 Decr 1803 to 31 Jany. 1804, @ 14 5/10 Cents 195.89
36 Rats. Whiskey @ 4 5/10 1.62
88 8/9 Flour @ 4 5/10 4.00
1800 Com. Rats. in Feby & March 1804 @ 14 5/10 261.00
283 Rats. Whiskey @ 4 5/10 12.74
286 3/4 lbs. Flour — 254 8/9 Rats. @ 4 5/10 11.47
6 quarts Salt @ 11 5/10 .69
155 lbx. — 137 7/8 Rats. Flour @ 4 5/10 6.20
120 lbs. — 96 Rats. Beef @ 4 5/10 4.32
219 Rats. Whiskey @ 4 5/10 9.85
For sundry articles provision delivd. to him at the Camp opposite the Mouth of Missouri River on 31st March 1804 including Kegs & bags to contain them 1,170.25
Paid for transporting Do. from Kaskaskias to Missouri 5.00
Paid for transporting provision for his detachmt. to the Camp at the River Dubois 22.50
   (The term "Comp Rats" stands for " complete rations" - an amount for one person.)32
     Elijah kept a store near Eddygrove (later Princeton) for a time, apparently in cooperation with his step-father, Matthew Lyon. A 1810 advertisement in the Russellville newspaper mentioned both his store and Lyon's, offering cash for rags at both stores.33 His principal occupation appears to have been as a farmer most of his life. In the 1850 census he reported his occupation as school teacher.34,35 He was described as a "poor farmer" by to his half-brother, Chittenden Lyon, in a 1828 letter to a mutual acquaintance.36
     Elijah sold his a tract on Eddy Creek to his cousins, Robert and Gideon Dyer Cobb Jr., on 8 Sep 1852. They paid $625 for 124 acres, but the Elijah retained the use of that portion lying north of the turnpike, and the spring, for his life and that of his wife. He retained the right not only to use the land himself, but also to rent it out, and to cut wood and timber for his own use.37,38
     Elijah died after 1854 in Lyon Co., Kentucky.11

Citations

  1. [S49] Freeman, Family File "David and Deborah.GED," 31 Jul 1998, shows full name.
  2. [S826] Lyon letter to Witherell, 5 Apr 1828, shows name as Elijah G. Galusha.
  3. [S892] "Kentucky Marriages to 1850," Ancestry.com, record for Elijah G. Galusha and Lucy Throop.
  4. [S3427] General Index to Vital Records of Vermont, record for Elijah Galusha, prepared by Arlington town clerk.
  5. [S826] Lyon letter to Witherell, 5 Apr 1828, shows Elijah as his half-brother, with surname Galusha.
  6. [S3427] General Index to Vital Records of Vermont, record for Elijah Galusha, prepared by Arlington town clerk, shows date.
  7. [S1980] Elijah G. Balusha household, 1850 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky, shows age 70 and state.
  8. [S892] "Kentucky Marriages to 1850," Ancestry.com, record for Elijah G. Galusha and Lucy Throop, shows date and county.
  9. [S826] Lyon letter to Witherell, 5 Apr 1828, shows he married the daughter of Mr. Troop.
  10. [S1980] Elijah G. Balusha household, 1850 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky, shows them apparently living as husband and wife.
  11. [S49] Freeman, Family File "David and Deborah.GED," 31 Jul 1998.
  12. [S2388] Matthew Lyon letter to Jackson, 28 Feb 1800, Lyon says he took with him one of his daughters and her husband, an unmarried daughter, a niece and her husband [Modena and Gideon] and several adventurers, and he intended to later bring his wife and family and others.
  13. [S1977] Cobb, Exit Laughing, pg 21, shows his great-grandfather "assembled his brood" in 1799 as part of nine-month trek overland, then by barge from Pittsburgh, by12 families, led by Matthew Lyon.
  14. [S2384] Matthew Lyon letter to Jefferson, 4 Apr 1801, 6th page, shows within a few days he would start for western waters, but expected to be detained a week or two at N Genevea before proceeding to the Cumberland River.
  15. [S2388] Matthew Lyon letter to Jackson, 28 Feb 1800, shows he had five teams, arrival in New Geneva, and his departure.
  16. [S2308] Ruth Cobb letter to Irvin S. Cobb, 29 Aug 1931, pg 10, shows the party traveled by covered wagon across the Allegenys to Pittsburg, then by flatboat to the Cumberland.
  17. [S1265] Wikipedia, online, article "Albert Gallatin," viewed 17 Jul 2008, shows Gallatin became a member of the House in 1795, and became minority leader as an important member of the Democratic-Republican Party before being appointed Secretary of the Treasury by Jefferson.
  18. [S2824] Certificates for land granted by the Livingston County Court, 1801-1806,, pg 4, no. 33, Elijah G. Galusha.
  19. [S1970] Livingston Co. Order Book, A:89, 5 May 1801; and B:[pages unnumbered], 4 Dec 1801.
  20. [S3198] "Eddyville Court-House," The Farmer's Friend, 2 Oct 1809.
  21. [S1971] Caldwell Co. Order Book, 1:49-50, 7 Nov 1809, John Bradley, Gideon D. Cobb, Saml C. Clark and Elijah G. Galusha bond for brick court house; C:10, 28 Jul 1818, order for G. D. Cobb and four others to view road and report; C:43, Nov 1818, Gideon D. Cobb, Saml. C. Clark, and three others to return inventory of estate of Jas. Hill; and C:83, 26 Apr 1819, Gideon D. Cobb appointed surveyor.
  22. [S3193] Fair Haven Deeds, 2:198, Elijah G. Galusha of Williston, Chittenden Co. to Nathaniel Dickinson, no recording date, grantor appeared before Josiah Norton, justice of the peace, 18 Feb 1802 to acknowledge his signature; 2:226, Nathaniel Dickinson to Elijah G. Galusha of Eddyville, Kentucky, 8 Aug 1803; and 2:227, Elijah G. Galusha of Eddyville, Kentucky to Alexander Dunchire of Castleton, Rutland Co., 8 Aug 1803.
  23. [S1970] Livingston Co. Order Book, B [pages unnumbered], 1 Apr 1805 and 2 Apr 1805; and C, 26 Jan 1808.
  24. [S1971] Caldwell Co. Order Book, 1:1-2.
  25. [S1971] Caldwell Co. Order Book, 1:20, 6 Jun 1809; 1:22, 6 Jun 1808; and 1:69, 5 Feb 1810.
  26. [S1971] Caldwell Co. Order Book, 1:96, 7 Aug 1810; 1:121, 3 Dec 1810; and 1:122-3, 4 Dec 1810.
  27. [S4474] Elijah Galusha household, 1810 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky.
  28. [S4475] Elijah Galusha household, 1820 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky.
  29. [S4476] Elijah G. Galucia household, 1830 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky.
  30. [S1981] Elijah G. Galusha household, 1840 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky.
  31. [S1980] Elijah G. Balusha household, 1850 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky.
  32. [S4198] Jackson, Letters of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, vol 1 pp 422, 429-30, citing Journal K, p. 5332.
  33. [S3413] Advertisement, Farmer's Friend, 26 Oct 1810.
  34. [S1981] Elijah G. Galusha household, 1840 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky, shows two persons employed in agriculture, presumably the two males, who are likely Elijah and son Henry.
  35. [S1980] Elijah G. Balusha household, 1850 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky, shows occupation as school teacher.
  36. [S826] Lyon letter to Witherell, 5 Apr 1828.
  37. [S1975] Caldwell Co. Deeds, Q:102-3, Elijah G. Galusha to R. L. & G. D. Cobb dated 8 Sep 1852; and P:87-9, Elijah G. Galusha mortgage to R. L. & G. D. Cobb, merchants of Eddyville, dated 24 Aug 1850.
  38. [S826] Lyon letter to Witherell, 5 Apr 1828, describes Galusha as "a poor farmer."
  39. [S1980] Elijah G. Balusha household, 1850 U.S. Census, Caldwell Co., Kentucky, shows them apparently living as parent and child.