Jacob Peck Imboden1,2,3

ID# 2498, (1846 - 1899)
FatherGeorge Imboden4,5,6 (abt 1793 - )
MotherIsabella Wünderlich4,5,6 (abt 1803 - )

Key Events:

Birth: 15 Sep 1846, Staunton, Augusta Co., Virginia7,8,9,10
Marriage: Rebecca John Mims, 21 Dec 186911,12,13
Marriage: Anna Stuart Dickinson, 17 Dec 1874, Shannondale, Fayette Co., West Virginia14,15
Marriage: Angela Gordon Colindres, 4 Jan 1891, Yuscarán, Honduras16,17
Marriage: Emily M. Renshaw, 1898, New York, New York18
Death: 5 Dec 1899, San Pedro Sula, Honduras19,20

Spouse:Rebecca John Mims (21 Jun 1848 - 21 Sep 1872)
     No children

Spouse:Anna Stuart Dickinson (18 Jan 1854 - 30 Jun 1938)
     Children:

  • Frank Bliss Imboden6 (5 Sep 1875 - 16 Jul 1941)
  • George Hudson Imboden6,43 (10 Jan 1877 - 2 May 1940)
  • Gertrude Imboden6,44 (Oct 1879 - 3 Feb 1964)

Spouse: Angela Gordon Colindres (23 May 1868 - )
     Children:

Spouse: Emily M. Renshaw (Oct 1874 - )
     No children

ChartsDescendants of Linah and Rebeccah (Davis) Mims

Copyright Notice

Narrative:

     Jacob Peck Imboden was born on 15 Sep 1846 in Staunton, Augusta Co., Virginia.7,8,9,10
     He appeared on the 1850 Federal Census of Augusta Co., Virginia, in the household of his parents, George Imboden and Isabella Wünderlich.21 He appeared on the 1860 Federal Census of Braxton Co., Virginia, in the household of his parents, George Imboden and Isabella Wünderlich.22

Schooling Interrupted by the Civil War --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Jacob enrolled at Virginia Military Institute 31 Mar 1864 and a few weeks later took part in the battle of New Market as a cadet private in Co. D, where he was slightly wounded by a shell fragment.6
     The Battle of New Market was a battle fought on 15 May 1864, in the Shenandoah Valley in the area around New Market, Virginia. A makeshift Confederate army of 4,100 men, which included cadets from the Virginia Military Institute, forced Union Major General Franz Sigel's army out of the Shenandoah Valley. The Confederate victory allowed the local crops to be harvested for Lee's Army of Northern Virginia and protected Lee's lines of communications to western Virginia.23
     Jacob did not return to the Institute but joined Company F, under Capt. Walter E. Franklin, 43rd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, as a private. Company F was organized 13 Sep 1864, near Delaplane, Virginia. The Battalion, also known as Mosby's Rangers, Mosby's Raiders, or Mosby's Men, was a battalion of partisan cavalry in the Confederate Army. They were noted for their lightning strikes on targets behind Union lines and their ability to consistently elude pursuit. It was formed under the Partisan Ranger Act of 1862. Members of these units were a variously described as soldiers, partisans, and rangers, while the Union viewed them as unsoldierly guerrillas hiding among civilians, a simple loose band of roving thieves. Confederate General Thomas Rosser agreed with the Union that Mosby's men were not soldiers but glorified thieves, and bad for morale because his regular troops were jealous.24,25,26
     The battalion seems to have kept few regular records. Jacob's compiled service record contains nothing but records of his parole at the end of the war. So we know nothing of the details of his service except that he was paroled 23 May 1865 at Staunton, Virginia, following Gen. Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House.27
     Jacob was one of five brothers who served in the Confederate Army until the end of the war. Capt. Francis and Gen. John Imboden were also at the battle of New Market. The other brothers were Col. George and Maj. James Imboden.6

Return to Civilian Life --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     Jacob married first Rebecca John Mims, daughter of John H. Mims and Caroline Hanson Cresap, on 21 Dec 1869.11,12,13
     She died on 21 Sep 1872 in Richmond, Virginia.28
     Jacob married second Anna Stuart Dickinson, daughter of Hudson M. Dickinson and Betty Ann Landcraft, on 17 Dec 1874 in Shannondale, Fayette Co., West Virginia, with C. W. Cook officiating.14,15
     It is known that Jacob was a mining engineer in Missouri and West Virginia, and later was a superintendent for a mining company in Georgia, though details have not been found. It appears that he and Anna moved to Missouri shortly after their marriage, but when they returned is unclear. The 1880 census shows all three of their children as born there, but later records show the two younger ones as born in West Virginia. While she and the children were back in West Virginia by 1880, his whereabouts then have not been found. It appears he never again lived with Anna and the children.29,30

A New Life in Central America --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     The "Liberal Reform" promoted by president Marco Aurelio Soto of Honduras in the 1880's led to the formation of several mining companies based on American capital. There was a substantial of inflow of Americans to, the country, particularly to the city of Yuscarán. Jacob decided to take part in this opportunity.31 He applied for a passport on 22 Nov 1884, in New York, New York, stating that he intended to travel to Central and South America.32 He left the U.S. on 9 Jul 1885, and remained in Central America, where he owned and managed a number of mines. It appears he did not return for at least a dozen years.33,34,35,36
     The number of Americans in the area prompted the United States goverment to open consular offices in an unknown place in the mid-1880's. Jacob served as consul there in 1886.31
     It is not clear that Jacob and Anna ever obtained a divorce. When he tried to re-marry in Honduras in 1890 he was denied permission because the witnesses he offered could not satisfy local authorities that he was unmarried. With a change in administration the following year he was permitted to marry.37
     Jacob married third Angela Gordon Colindres, daughter of Máximo Gordon and Jesús Colindres, on 4 Jan 1891 in Yuscarán, Honduras.16,17
     On 19 Feb 1895 he again applied for a passport, from Guatemala, stating that his permanent residence was Richmond, Virginia, he intended to return to the U.S. within two years by himself, and that his reason for applying was for "protection."38 He applied for a passport again in Guatemala on 1 Oct 1897, this time to include his wife, Angela and his three minor children, Jacob, Ranl and Blanca. His stated permanent residence is confused: New York, in the state of Virginia. He again stated he had left the U.S. in Jul 1885, and intended to return within two years.39

Returning to the U.S. --- Text Stolen from ReigelRidge.com !! ---


     We know he did return to the U.S. this time, arriving at New Orleans, Louisiana, 30 Nov 1897 aboard the Breakewater. He arrived without the wife and children.40
     Jacob was named general manager of the Honduras-American Cattle, Agricultural and Colonization Company when its formation was announced in Feb 1898 in New York. The company had obtained a 25-year exclusive right from the Republic of Honduras to import and export cattle without duty, and to establish slaughter-houses, refrigerators, and canning factories without taxation.41
     Jacob married fourth Emily M. Renshaw, daughter of Morrison Renshaw and Jennie [surname unknown], in the summer of 1898 in New York, New York.18 She was described in one newspaper article as a "belle at eastern summer resorts who married a dashing ex-Confederate," a "handsome woman of cosmopolitan ideas." Her wealthy grandfather cut her out of his will, supposedly because he objected to her marriage because her husband was a great deal older than her. When he died shortly thereafter she sued to be awarded her late father's one-sixth share.18
     It appears Jacob remained in the U.S. for a time, unless he made another brief trip. He was in New York when he applied for a passport there on 21 Jan 1899, claiming New York as his permanent residence.42
     Jacob died on 5 Dec 1899 in San Pedro Sula, Honduras, at age 53. He was shot 3 Dec by Joaquin Hernandez, a Secretary in the Criminal Court, who intended to kill a friend of Jacob's, but who survived the attack.19,20

Citations

  1. [S2009] Couper and Gibson, The Corps Forward, pg 101, shows name as Jacob Peck Imboden.
  2. [S7437] George Imboden household, 1850 U.S. Census, Augusta Co., Virginia, shows name as Jacob P. Imboden.
  3. [S736] Cresap and Cresap, History of the Cresaps, pg 322, shows name as Jacob P. Imboden.
  4. [S7437] George Imboden household, 1850 U.S. Census, Augusta Co., Virginia, shows them apparently living as parent and child.
  5. [S7438] Register of Marriages, Fayette Co., West Virginia, vol 1 pg 24, Jacob P. Imboden and Betty A. S. Dickinson, 1874.
  6. [S2009] Couper and Gibson, The Corps Forward, pg 101.
  7. [S7437] George Imboden household, 1850 U.S. Census, Augusta Co., Virginia, shows age 4 and state.
  8. [S2004] Jacob P. Imboden, Passport Application (22 Nov 1884), shows date, with year as 1845, county, and state.
  9. [S2005] J. P. Imboden, Passport Application (19 Feb 1895), shows date, with year as 1846, town, and state.
  10. [S2009] Couper and Gibson, The Corps Forward, pg 101, shows date, with year as 1846, Christian's Creek farm, county, and state.
  11. [S2003] John Mims Family Bible, shows date.
  12. [S736] Cresap and Cresap, History of the Cresaps, pg 322, shows year.
  13. [S2009] Couper and Gibson, The Corps Forward, pg 101, shows he married Johnnie Meems of Kentucky.
  14. [S7438] Register of Marriages, Fayette Co., West Virginia, vol 1 pg 24, Jacob P. Imboden and Betty A. S. Dickinson, 1874, shows date, town, and officiant.
  15. [S2009] Couper and Gibson, The Corps Forward, pg 101, shows as his second marriage.
  16. [S2006] J. P. Imboden, Passport Application (1 Oct 1897), shows he intended to be accompanied by his wife Angela when he returned to the U.S.
  17. [S7448] Hector Ramon Cortes Caceres, "El Cónsul norteamericano Jacob P. Imboden", shows date and city.
  18. [S7450] "Mrs. Imboden Wants a Share," St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 29 Jul 1900.
  19. [S2008] "American Killed," New Haven Evening Register, 12 Jan 1900, shows that a Dec. 14 report from Guatemala City reported he had been shot, and buy whom.
  20. [S2009] Couper and Gibson, The Corps Forward, pg 101-2, shows he was wounded 3 Dec 1899 at San Pedro Sula, Honduras, and died 5 Dec 1899, names attacker and says he intended to kill a friend of Imboden.
  21. [S7437] George Imboden household, 1850 U.S. Census, Augusta Co., Virginia.
  22. [S2011] George Imboden household, 1860 U.S. Census, Baxton Co., Virginia.
  23. [S1265] Wikipedia, online, article "Battle of New Market," viewed Mar 2017.
  24. [S2009] Couper and Gibson, The Corps Forward, pg 101, shows he joined Capt. Frank's Company of Mosby's Battalion remaining until the end of the war.
  25. [S1265] Wikipedia, online, article "43rd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry," viewed Mar 2017.
  26. [S7454] J. Imboden, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Virginia, shows rank and company.
  27. [S7454] J. Imboden, Compiled Service Records, Confederate, Virginia.
  28. [S2003] John Mims Family Bible, shows date, city, and state.
  29. [S2009] Couper and Gibson, The Corps Forward, pg 101, shows occupation as mining engineer in three states.
  30. [S7444] Dickinson Walker household, 1880 U.S. Census, Fayette Co., West Virginia, shows Annie and the children in her brother's household.
  31. [S7449] Hector Ramon Cortes Caceres, "El Consulado Norteamericano en Yuscarán."
  32. [S2004] Jacob P. Imboden, Passport Application (22 Nov 1884).
  33. [S2005] J. P. Imboden, Passport Application (19 Feb 1895), shows he left the U.S. 9 Jul 1885; shows occupation as civil engineer.
  34. [S2009] Couper and Gibson, The Corps Forward, pg 101, shows he managed mines he owned in Central America from 1884 until his death.
  35. [S2008] "American Killed," New Haven Evening Register, 12 Jan 1900, shows he "had been interested for many years in mining in Honduras.
  36. [S2006] J. P. Imboden, Passport Application (1 Oct 1897), shows he had left the U.S. in Jul 1885.
  37. [S7448] Hector Ramon Cortes Caceres, "El Cónsul norteamericano Jacob P. Imboden."
  38. [S2005] J. P. Imboden, Passport Application (19 Feb 1895).
  39. [S2006] J. P. Imboden, Passport Application (1 Oct 1897).
  40. [S2012] Breakwater arrival 30 Nov 1897, Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New Orleans, Louisiana, 1820-1902, shows Jacob Imboden, age 47, with no other recognizable family members.
  41. [S7451] "To Control Honduras's Cattle Trade," New York Tribune, 9 Feb 1898.
  42. [S2010] Imboden, Passport Application (21 Jan 1899).
  43. [S7439] George H. Imboden, Standard Certificate of Death.
  44. [S7441] Gertrude Imboden Davis, Certificate of Death.
  45. [S2006] J. P. Imboden, Passport Application (1 Oct 1897), shows he intended to be accompanied by his minor child Jacob when he returned to the U.S.
  46. [S2006] J. P. Imboden, Passport Application (1 Oct 1897), shows he intended to be accompanied by his minor child Ranl when he returned to the U.S.
  47. [S2006] J. P. Imboden, Passport Application (1 Oct 1897), shows he intended to be accompanied by his minor child Blanca when he returned to the U.S.