James W. Street1,2,3

ID# 20865, (abt 1844 - 1864)
FatherJohn M. Street4,5,6 (abt 14 Apr 1808 - 28 Jun 1887)
MotherMariah Brady4,5 (abt 19 Feb 1814 - 7 May 1902)

Key Events:

Birth: about 29 Feb 1844, Missouri7,8,9
Death: 20 Oct 1864, Grand Pass, Saline Co., Missouri10,11
Burial: Streets Family Cemetery, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Missouri12
ChartsDescendants of David Dutt/Toot
AncestryThe Dutt/Toot Family

Copyright Notice

Narrative:

     James W. Street was born about 29 Feb 1844 in Missouri.7,8,9 He appeared on the 1850 Federal Census of Carroll Co., Missouri, in the household of his parents, John M. Street and Mariah Brady.13 He appeared on the 1860 Federal Census of Morris Twp., Carroll Co., Missouri, in the household of his parents.14
     The Enrolled Missouri Militia was created in Jul 1862 in response to a Confederate recruiting program begun that summer behind Federal lines in northeast Missouri. The previously established Missouri State Militia did not have the resources to address the growing guerrilla attacks. The new militia composed of part-time citizen soldiers was established to free the State Militia and Federal troops for field action. Most men in this militia served only a few weeks of active duty over the course of the next two and a half years.15
     The organization of the militia in Carroll Co., Missouri began in early late summer of 1862. The 65th Enrolled Missouri Militia was organized under Col. John B. Hale, with ten companies composed of men from Carroll and Livingston counties.16 James and his older brother Andrew enrolled in Co. A, as privates under Capt. Minnis, on 28 Jul 1862. They entered active service the same day, and were released 6 Dec 1862, after 168 days in active service. The older brother, Andrew, was promoted to 1st lieutenant, though just when has not been found. John Wesley Isom, husband of their eldest sister, Sarah Jane, enrolled in the same unit on 9 Aug and served with them. James was detailed again from 24 Mar to 30 Apr 1863.17,18,19
     The Provisional Enrolled Missouri Militia began organizing in May 1863 to replace the part-time Enrolled Missouri Militia. The new militia was composed of full-time troops, selected from the earlier militia. They were to be those "who could most easily be spared from their ordinary avocations, having but few if any others dependent upon their labor for support." They would become eligible for Federal pensions after the war.15 James enrolled as a private in Co. E, 4th Regiment Provisional Enrolled Missouri Militia 5 Mar 1864, at Carrollton, Missouri, under Capt. Calvert. He was ordered into active service the same day, and he was relieved from duty 1 Sep 1864. His brother-in-law, John Wesley Isom, enrolled in the same unit three months after James did.20,21
     James is shown as enrolling in Capt. Beaty's Carroll County Provisional Enrolled Missouri Militia as a private 1 Aug 1864 at Carrollton, Missouri, though he is not shown as released from his previous unit until a month later. At first the unit was known as Beaty's Co. Carroll County Citizen Guards, an unpaid organization, even though his company was paid under the authorization of the P. E. M. M. His older brother Andrew was a 1st. lieutenant and his younger brother John was a corporal in the unit. James was mustered into the unit 21 Sep 1864.22,23,24
     In the first week of Oct 1864 two Confederate officers, Col. Perry and Lt. Williams, were on leave to visit their homes in Livingston Co. Resting near Coloma they were found by a detachment of Maj. Deigel's unit, including James and John. The two Confederate officers were killed, an action the details of which remain disputed. The two brothers were clearly present, though their roles are unknown.25
     Confederate Gen. Price's raid on Missouri had reached this area by mid Oct, and on 17 Oct 1864 a considerable force appeared at Corrollton and demanded it surrender. Maj. Diegel agreed to terms of a surrender, which included an agreement the troops would be immediately paroled and allowed to return home. However, the prisoners were not released as agreed but were held under guard.26
     The next day the officers were paroled, but the men were marched away, eventually reaching the headquarters of Gen. Price, in Grand Pass, Saline Co., Missouri. The next morning six men, including James and John, were called out by name, taken to a ravine, and shot dead. All had been on the patrol that killed the two Confederate officers, though two were not actually present. All the other men were then released.27,28,29
     James died on 20 Oct 1864 in Grand Pass, Saline Co., Missouri, shot while a prisoner of war.10,11 He was buried in Streets Family Cemetery, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Missouri, after being temporarily buried near where he was killed.12

Citations

  1. [S6968] John M. Street household, 1850 U.S. Census, Carroll Co., Missouri, shows name as James W. Street.
  2. [S6977] John M. Street household, 1860 U.S. Census, Carroll Co., Missouri, shows name as James Street.
  3. [S500] Findagrave.com, online, memorial # 7037893, James W. Street, includes tombstone photo showing same.
  4. [S6968] John M. Street household, 1850 U.S. Census, Carroll Co., Missouri, shows them apparently living as parent and child.
  5. [S6977] John M. Street household, 1860 U.S. Census, Carroll Co., Missouri, shows them apparently living as parent and child.
  6. [S6993] History of Carroll County, Missouri, pg 362.
  7. [S500] Findagrave.com, online, memorial # 7037893, James W. Street, includes tombstone photo showing age 20 yr 7 mo 20 days at death 20 Oct 1864.
  8. [S6968] John M. Street household, 1850 U.S. Census, Carroll Co., Missouri, shows age 6 and state.
  9. [S6993] History of Carroll County, Missouri, pg 362, shows county.
  10. [S500] Findagrave.com, online, memorial # 7037893, James W. Street, shows date and includes tombstone photo showing same.
  11. [S6993] History of Carroll County, Missouri, pg 361, shows place and event.
  12. [S500] Findagrave.com, online, memorial # 7037893, James W. Street, includes tombstone photo.
  13. [S6968] John M. Street household, 1850 U.S. Census, Carroll Co., Missouri.
  14. [S6977] John M. Street household, 1860 U.S. Census, Carroll Co., Missouri.
  15. [S7145] Civil War St Louis, online, Kirby Ross, "Federal Militia in Missouri."
  16. [S6993] History of Carroll County, Missouri, pg 324.
  17. [S7213] Andrew J. Street, 65th Reg't. E. M. M., Co. A, Soldiers' Records cards.
  18. [S7214] James W. Street, 65th Reg't. E. M. M., Co. A, Soldiers' Records cards.
  19. [S7209] John W. Isom, 65th Reg't. E. M. M., Soldiers' Records cards.
  20. [S7215] James W. Street, 4th Prov. Reg't. Enrolled Mo. Militia, Co. E, Soldiers' Records cards.
  21. [S7210] John W. Isom, 4th Prov. Reg't. Enrolled Mo. Militia. Co. E, Soldiers' Records cards.
  22. [S7219] Andrew J. Street, Beaty's Co. Carroll County Citzen Guards; and Beaty's Carroll County Prov. E.M.M., Soldiers' Records cards.
  23. [S7221] John A. Street, Beaty's Co. Carroll County Citzen Guards; and Beaty's Carroll County Prov. E.M.M., Soldiers' Records cards.
  24. [S7220] James W. Street, Beaty's Co. Carroll County Citzen Guards; and Beaty's Carroll County Prov. E.M.M., Soldiers' Records cards.
  25. [S6993] History of Carroll County, Missouri, pp 358-9.
  26. [S6993] History of Carroll County, Missouri, pp 359-61.
  27. [S6993] History of Carroll County, Missouri, pp 361-2.
  28. [S7220] James W. Street, Beaty's Co. Carroll County Citzen Guards; and Beaty's Carroll County Prov. E.M.M., Soldiers' Records cards, Citizen Guard card shows killed by rebels and date; P.E.M.M. card shows record defaced but appears to show he died of wounds 18 Oct 1864.
  29. [S7221] John A. Street, Beaty's Co. Carroll County Citzen Guards; and Beaty's Carroll County Prov. E.M.M., Soldiers' Records cards, Citizen Guard card shows killed by rebels and date; P.E.M.M. card shows killed by guerillas and date.